Factors associated with general surgery residents’ decisions regarding fellowship and subspecialty stratified by burnout and quality of life

Natalie C. McClintock, Kelsey E. Gray, Angela L. Neville, Amy H. Kaji, Mary M. Wolfe, Kristine E. Calhoun, Farin F. Amersi, Timothy R. Donahue, Tracey D. Arnell, Benjamin T. Jarman, Kenji Inaba, Marc L. Melcher, Jon B. Morris, Brian R. Smith, Mark E. Reeves, Jeffrey M. Gauvin, Edgardo S. Salcedo, Richard A. Sidwell, Daniel L. Dent, Kenric M. MurayamaRichard B. Damewood, Venkateswara P. Poola, Christian M. de Virgilio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Although most surgery residents pursue fellowships, data regarding those decisions are limited. This study describes associations with interest in fellowship and specific subspecialties. Methods: Anonymous surveys were distributed to 607 surgery residents at 19 US programs. Subspecialties were stratified by levels of burnout and quality of life using data from recent studies. Results: 407 (67%) residents responded. 372 (91.4%) planned to pursue fellowship. Fellowship interest was lower among residents who attended independent or small programs, were married, or had children. Residents who received AOA honors or were married were less likely to choose high burnout subspecialties (trauma/vascular). Residents with children were less likely to choose low quality of life subspecialties (trauma/transplant/cardiothoracic). Conclusions: Surgery residents' interest in fellowship and specific subspecialties are associated with program type and size, AOA status, marital status, and having children. Variability in burnout and quality of life between subspecialties may affect residents’ decisions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1090-1095
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of surgery
Volume218
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2019

Keywords

  • Burnout
  • Fellowship
  • Quality of life
  • Subspecialty
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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