Extension of longevity and reduction of inflammation is ovarian-dependent, but germ cell-independent in post-reproductive female mice

Tracy L. Habermehl, Kate C. Parkinson, Gene B. Hubbard, Yuji Ikeno, Jennifer I. Engelmeyer, Björn Schumacher, Jeffrey B. Mason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease, rare in premenopausal women, increases sharply at menopause and is typically accompanied by chronic inflammation. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that replacing senescent ovaries in post-reproductive mice with young, actively cycling ovaries restored many health benefits, including decreased cardiomyopathy and restoration of immune function. Our objective here was to determine if depletion of germ cells from young transplanted ovaries would alter the ovarian-dependent extension of life and health span. Sixty-day-old germ cell-depleted and germ cell-containing ovaries were transplanted to post-reproductive, 17-month-old mice. Mean life span for female CBA/J mice is approximately 644 days. Mice that received germ cell-containing ovaries lived 798 days (maximum = 815 days). Mice that received germ cell-depleted ovaries lived 880 days (maximum = 1046 days), 29% further past the time of surgery than mice that received germ cell-containing ovaries. The severity of inflammation was reduced in all mice that received young ovaries, whether germ cell-containing or germ cell-depleted. Aging-associated inflammatory cytokine changes were reversed in post-reproductive mice by 4 months of new-ovary exposure. In summary, germ cell depletion enhanced the longevity-extending effects of the young, transplanted ovaries and, as with germ cell-containing ovaries, decreased the severity of inflammation, but did so independent of germ cells. Based on these observations, we propose that gonadal somatic cells are programed to preserve the somatic health of the organism with the intent of facilitating future germline transmission. As reproductive potential decreases or is lost, the incentive to preserve the somatic health of the organism is lost as well.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-38
Number of pages14
JournalGeroScience
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2019

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Germ cell
  • Inflammation
  • Life span
  • Menopause
  • Ovarian

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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