Extended lateral parascapular approach for resection of a giant multi-compartment thoracic schwannoma

Giacomo G. Vecil, Ian E. McCutcheon, Ehud Mendel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Resection of giant thoracic schwannomas is challenging and usually requires a staged approach. The resection of the intraspinal component, usually via laminectomy, is done in one sitting and the intrathoracic component, via thoracotomy, follows at another. We describe the complete resection of a massive multi-compartmental thoracic schwannoma by an extended lateral parascapular approach. Method and findings: The tumor, which presented with local pain and scapular displacement, had intrathoracic paraspinal (10 × 5 × 4 cm), posterolateral upper thoracic paramuscular (19 × 7 × 4 cm), foraminal, and epidural components. It was removed at a single sitting, via a posterior extended lateral parascapular approach that did not require staged procedures, multiple incisions, or repositioning of the patient. This operation included resection of the thoracic, foraminal, and intraspinal components and posterior stabilization with pedicle screws and rods. There were no postoperative neurological complications. Conclusions: The extended lateral parascapular approach allows complete resection of giant multi-compartment schwannomas of the thoracic spine that extend from the canal into the thoracic cavity. It also permits posterior stabilization through the same incision used for tumor removal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1295-1300
Number of pages6
JournalActa Neurochirurgica
Volume150
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neurilemmoma
Thorax
Thoracic Cavity
Moving and Lifting Patients
Laminectomy
Thoracotomy
Neoplasms
Spine
Pain

Keywords

  • Dumbbell tumor
  • Giant schwannoma
  • Posterior approach
  • Posterior mediastinal mass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Extended lateral parascapular approach for resection of a giant multi-compartment thoracic schwannoma. / Vecil, Giacomo G.; McCutcheon, Ian E.; Mendel, Ehud.

In: Acta Neurochirurgica, Vol. 150, No. 12, 12.2008, p. 1295-1300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vecil, Giacomo G. ; McCutcheon, Ian E. ; Mendel, Ehud. / Extended lateral parascapular approach for resection of a giant multi-compartment thoracic schwannoma. In: Acta Neurochirurgica. 2008 ; Vol. 150, No. 12. pp. 1295-1300.
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