Exercise training decreases the concentration of malonyl-CoA and increases the expression and activity of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase in human muscle.

Jeanette E. Kuhl, Neil B. Ruderman, Nicolas Musi, Laurie J. Goodyear, Mary Elizabeth Patti, Sarah Crunkhorn, Deepti Dronamraju, Anders Thorell, Jonas Nygren, Olle Ljungkvist, Marie Degerblad, Agneta Stahle, Torkel B. Brismar, Kirstine L. Andersen, Asish K. Saha, Suad Efendic, Peter N. Bavenholm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

The study was designed to evaluate whether changes in malonyl-CoA and the enzymes that govern its concentration occur in human muscle as a result of physical training. Healthy, middle-aged subjects were studied before and after a 12-wk training program that significantly increased VO2 max by 13% and decreased intra-abdominal fat by 17%. Significant decreases (25-30%) in the concentration of malonyl-CoA were observed after training, 24-36 h after the last bout of exercise. They were accompanied by increases in both the activity (88%) and mRNA (51%) of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD) in muscle but no changes in the phosphorylation of AMP kinase (AMPK, Thr172) or of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. The abundance of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha), a regulator of transcription that has been linked to the mediation of MCD expression by PPARalpha, was also increased (3-fold). In studies also conducted 24-36 h after the last bout of exercise, no evidence of increased whole body insulin sensitivity or fatty acid oxidation was observed during an euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. In conclusion, the concentration of malonyl-CoA is diminished in muscle after physical training, most likely because of PGC-1alpha-mediated increases in MCD expression and activity. These changes persist after the increases in AMPK activity and whole body insulin sensitivity and fatty acid oxidation, typically caused by an acute bout of exercise in healthy individuals, have dissipated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E1296-1303
JournalAmerican journal of physiology. Endocrinology and metabolism
Volume290
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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