Exercise and Creatine Supplementation to Augment the Adaptation of Exercise Training among Breast Cancer Survivors Completing Chemotherapy: Protocol for an Open-label Randomized Controlled Trial (the THRIVE Study)

Darpan I. Patel, Angela Gonzalez, Crisann Moon, Monica Serra, Preston Blake Bridges, Daniel Hughes, Geoffrey D Clarke, Lisa Kilpela, Rozmin Jiwani, Nicolas Musi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: In breast cancer survivors, chemotherapy-induced muscle loss has been shown to be attenuated with structured resistance exercise. Creatine supplementation can increase bioenergetics in skeletal muscle, which helps to improve overall strength and endurance and reduce muscular fatigue. Therefore, we hypothesize that adding creatinine supplementation to exercise training will accelerate improvements in strength, endurance, and bioenergetics in breast cancer survivors. Objective: The primary objective is to determine the effects of combining creatine supplementation with exercise on modulating strength and physical function in breast cancer survivors by comparing these effects to those of exercise alone. The secondary objectives are to determine if creatine supplementation and exercise can increase the intramuscular storage of creatine and improve body composition by comparing this intervention to exercise alone. Methods: We aim to test our hypothesis by conducting an open-label randomized controlled trial of 30 breast cancer survivors who have completed chemotherapy within 6 months of enrollment. Eligible participants will be equally randomized (1:1) to either a creatine and exercise group or an exercise-only group for this 12-week intervention. Individuals who are randomized to receive creatine will be initially dosed at 20 g per day for 7 days to boost the availability of creatine systemically. Thereafter, the dose will be reduced to 5 g per day for maintenance throughout the duration of the 12-week protocol. All participants will engage in 3 center-based exercise sessions, which will involve completing 3 sets of 8 to 12 repetitions on chest press, leg press, seated row, shoulder press, leg extension, and leg curl machines. The primary outcomes will include changes in strength, body composition, and physical function in breast cancer survivors. The secondary outcomes will be intramuscular concentrations of creatine and adenosine triphosphate in the vastus lateralis, midthigh cross-sectional area, and quality of life. Results: As of October 2021, a total of 9 patients have been enrolled into the study. No unexpected adverse events have been reported. Conclusions: Creatine is being studied as a potential agent for improving strength, endurance, and bioenergetics in breast cancer survivors following chemotherapy. The findings from our trial may have future implications for supporting breast cancer survivors in reversing the muscle loss experienced during chemotherapy and improving their physical function and quality of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere26827
JournalJMIR Research Protocols
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2022

Keywords

  • doxorubicin
  • oncology
  • quality of life
  • rehabilitation
  • resistant exercise
  • supplements

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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