Executive Function Impairment and Recidivism in Adult Protective Services Clients Referred for a Decision Making Capacity Assessment

Katherine A. Terracina, Whitley W. Aamodt, Jason Schillerstrom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine if recidivistic Adult Protective Services (APS) cases referred for a decision-making capacity assessment were more cognitively impaired than nonrecidivistic cases. A retrospective medical record review of neuropsychological and demographic data was gathered during decisional capacity assessments. Recidivistic clients were those referred to APS more than once; those with a single open case were nonrecidivistic. Mean neuropsychological test scores were compared between recidivistic (n = 138) and nonrecidivistic (n = 95) subjects. No significant differences were found for age, gender, ethnicity, education, or dwelling status. Both recidivistic and nonrecidivistic cases performed poorly in all cognitive domains. Recidivistic clients performed significantly worse on measures of executive function (CLOX1, EXIT25). Executive function impairments seem to be one risk factor for recidivism in APS referrals. With 60% of cases referred for decision capacity assessments being recidivistic, identifying risk factors may help identify when targeted interventions are indicated to preclude recurrence of abuse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-99
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Elder Abuse and Neglect
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2015

Keywords

  • Adult Protective Services
  • executive function
  • recidivism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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