Excision and Primary Reanastomosis of the Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery for Treatment of a Ruptured Mycotic Aneurysm: 2-Dimensional Operative Video

Justin Mascitelli, Sirin Gandhi, Claudio Cavallo, Jacob Baranoski, Ali Tayebi Meybodi, Michael T. Lawton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysms are rare lesions with a predisposition for distal location and non-saccular morphology.1,2 These aneurysms are less amenable to clipping and may instead require aneurysm trapping with bypass.3 This video reports a novel bypass for a ruptured, fusiform distal AICA aneurysm. A 51-yr-old woman with newly diagnosed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome presented to the hospital with meningitis and experienced an acute neurological decline while admitted. Neuroimaging revealed a fusiform left a2-AICA aneurysm, thought to be mycotic with diffuse subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage (Hunt-Hess Grade-IV). The occipital artery was harvested as an alternative donor in the myocutaneous flap using a hockey-stick incision. An extended retrosigmoid approach exposed the infectious aneurysm. After aneurysm excision, an a2-AICA-a2-AICA end-to-end reanastomosis was performed in between and deep to the vestibulocochlear nerves superiorly and the glossopharyngeal nerve inferiorly. Indocyanine green videoangiography and postoperative angiogram confirmed bypass patency. Postoperatively, she developed epidural and subdural hematomas due to human immunodeficiency virus-associated coagulopathy and/or increased aspirin sensitivity, requiring reoperation. The patient made a complete recovery at late follow-up. AICA reanastomosis is an elegant intracranial-intracranial bypass for treating distal AICA aneurysms. To our knowledge, this is the first report of AICA reanastomosis in the proximal a2-AICA (lateral pontine) segment. This technique has been reported in the literature for distally located aneurysms (a3-AICA).4 Microanastomosis for more medial AICA aneurysms must be performed deep to the lower cranial nerves. OA to a3-AICA bypass is an alternative in cases where primary reanastomosis is not technically feasible. (Published with permission from Barrow Neurological Institute).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E58-E59
JournalOperative neurosurgery (Hagerstown, Md.)
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2020
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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