Evidence for host-induced selection in Schistosoma mansoni

Philip T Loverde, J. DeWald, D. J. Minchella, S. C. Bosshardt, R. T. Damian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A population of Schistosoma mansoni from Kenya was isolated in 1968 and subsequently passaged simultaneously through 2 different vertebrate hosts: baboons and mice. Recent electrophoretic studies demonstrated that genetic differences in the degree of polymorphism and in allele frequencies of polymorphic loci existed between S. mansoni populations from the 2 hosts. The present study was undertaken to assess the importance of vertebrate host-induced selection against particular alleles as the mechanism to account for the observed differences. A population of S. mansoni which had originally been passaged through baboons and subsequently passaged through murine hosts for 4 generations was studied. At least 20 infected snails served as the source of parasite for each mouse passage. Allele frequencies of 4 polymorphic loci were assessed for each generation using horizontal starch gel electrophoresis. All 4 polymorphic loci (PGM-2, MDH-2, MDH-1, PGI) showed a selective trend towards allele frequencies identical with that of a strain (from the same isolate) maintained in mice for 12 yr. These data suggest that vertebrate host-induced selection results in a decrease in parasite variability due to loss of alleles as field isolates of S. mansoni are passaged in murine hosts. The use of non-human primate hosts, on the other hand, maintains a higher level of parasite variability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-301
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Parasitology
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Schistosoma mansoni
Gene Frequency
Vertebrates
Parasites
allele
Papio
mice
gene frequency
Alleles
parasite
vertebrate
Population
Starch Gel Electrophoresis
vertebrates
Kenya
parasites
Snails
loci
Primates
alleles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Loverde, P. T., DeWald, J., Minchella, D. J., Bosshardt, S. C., & Damian, R. T. (1985). Evidence for host-induced selection in Schistosoma mansoni. Journal of Parasitology, 71(3), 297-301. https://doi.org/10.2307/3282010

Evidence for host-induced selection in Schistosoma mansoni. / Loverde, Philip T; DeWald, J.; Minchella, D. J.; Bosshardt, S. C.; Damian, R. T.

In: Journal of Parasitology, Vol. 71, No. 3, 1985, p. 297-301.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Loverde, PT, DeWald, J, Minchella, DJ, Bosshardt, SC & Damian, RT 1985, 'Evidence for host-induced selection in Schistosoma mansoni', Journal of Parasitology, vol. 71, no. 3, pp. 297-301. https://doi.org/10.2307/3282010
Loverde, Philip T ; DeWald, J. ; Minchella, D. J. ; Bosshardt, S. C. ; Damian, R. T. / Evidence for host-induced selection in Schistosoma mansoni. In: Journal of Parasitology. 1985 ; Vol. 71, No. 3. pp. 297-301.
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