Ethnic and Gender Differences in the Diagnostic Profiles of Substance Abusers

Albana M. Dassori, James A. Neff, Sue K. Hoppe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of the study was to evaluate ethnic and gender differences in the diagnostic profiles of patients first admitted to the alcohol/drug rehabilitation unit of a state hospital. The majority of the patients (66%) had more than one diagnosis. African-American patients were significantly more likely to have a single diagnosis, however. In terms of primary diagnosis, Mexican Americans were more likely to have an alcoholrelated disorder while African-Americans were more likely to have a drug related disorder Drug-related disorders also complicate the diagnostic profile of African-American patients who had a primary diagnosis of an alcohol-related disorder Ethnic differences in type of drug abused were observed. African Americans were more likely to use stimulants/hallucinogens, and Mexican Americans were more likely to use depressants. A drug-related disorder was the most common diagnosis among females across all ethnic groups. Findings pointto the need of developing gender/ethnic-sensitive treatment programs. Potential ethnic and gender biases in the diagnostic evaluation of substance abuse patients are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)382-390
Number of pages9
JournalHispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology
  • Linguistics and Language

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