Estimating the impact of new clinical trial proven cancer therapy and cancer chemoprevention on population mortality: the Karnofsky Memorial lecture.

Joseph M. Unger, Michael LeBlanc, John J. Crowley, H. Barton Grossman, Ronald B. Natale, Antoinette J. Wozniak, James R. Berenson, Alan F. List, William A. Peters, Robert C. Flanigan, John S. Macdonald, Muhyi Al-Sarraf, Ian M. Thompson, Charles A. Coltman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: The 31-year "war on cancer" has focused largely on therapeutic (as opposed to preventative) cancer research, which, in both the public and private sector, has received the majority of funding. Meanwhile the prevention of cancer has received less attention. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed eight positive phase III therapeutic trials of the Southwest Oncology Group, and estimated how the observed improvements in survival from the new therapies would impact mortality at the population level (utilizing Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-data). We compared these results with the impact of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. The measure of impact was person-years saved in the first 5 years. RESULTS: Estimates of person-years saved in the first 5 years included 28,534 from improved treatment of localized bladder cancer and 26,241 from improved treatment of advanced lung cancer, representing, respectively, 31.4% and 2.8% of the person-years which could have been saved for these diseases (the "relative impact of new treatment on survival"). The new therapies from all eight positive phase III trials would have saved 114,641 person-years over the first 5 years. The estimate from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial was 99,441 person-years over the first 5 years. CONCLUSION: New cancer therapies have a proven and quantifiable impact on population mortality. Successful cancer prevention has a similarly large impact. However, federal funding for cancer prevention is less than half that of cancer treatment. As a result of its enormous potential for extending life, cancer prevention warrants increased funding and support from federal funding agencies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
Volume21
Issue number23 Suppl
StatePublished - Dec 1 2003

Fingerprint

Chemoprevention
Clinical Trials
Mortality
Population
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Prostatic Neoplasms
Private Sector
Survival
Public Sector
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Lung Neoplasms
Epidemiology
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Estimating the impact of new clinical trial proven cancer therapy and cancer chemoprevention on population mortality : the Karnofsky Memorial lecture. / Unger, Joseph M.; LeBlanc, Michael; Crowley, John J.; Grossman, H. Barton; Natale, Ronald B.; Wozniak, Antoinette J.; Berenson, James R.; List, Alan F.; Peters, William A.; Flanigan, Robert C.; Macdonald, John S.; Al-Sarraf, Muhyi; Thompson, Ian M.; Coltman, Charles A.

In: Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 21, No. 23 Suppl, 01.12.2003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Unger, JM, LeBlanc, M, Crowley, JJ, Grossman, HB, Natale, RB, Wozniak, AJ, Berenson, JR, List, AF, Peters, WA, Flanigan, RC, Macdonald, JS, Al-Sarraf, M, Thompson, IM & Coltman, CA 2003, 'Estimating the impact of new clinical trial proven cancer therapy and cancer chemoprevention on population mortality: the Karnofsky Memorial lecture.', Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, vol. 21, no. 23 Suppl.
Unger, Joseph M. ; LeBlanc, Michael ; Crowley, John J. ; Grossman, H. Barton ; Natale, Ronald B. ; Wozniak, Antoinette J. ; Berenson, James R. ; List, Alan F. ; Peters, William A. ; Flanigan, Robert C. ; Macdonald, John S. ; Al-Sarraf, Muhyi ; Thompson, Ian M. ; Coltman, Charles A. / Estimating the impact of new clinical trial proven cancer therapy and cancer chemoprevention on population mortality : the Karnofsky Memorial lecture. In: Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. 2003 ; Vol. 21, No. 23 Suppl.
@article{340ad18426044ff0a19d6746f628a275,
title = "Estimating the impact of new clinical trial proven cancer therapy and cancer chemoprevention on population mortality: the Karnofsky Memorial lecture.",
abstract = "PURPOSE: The 31-year {"}war on cancer{"} has focused largely on therapeutic (as opposed to preventative) cancer research, which, in both the public and private sector, has received the majority of funding. Meanwhile the prevention of cancer has received less attention. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed eight positive phase III therapeutic trials of the Southwest Oncology Group, and estimated how the observed improvements in survival from the new therapies would impact mortality at the population level (utilizing Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-data). We compared these results with the impact of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. The measure of impact was person-years saved in the first 5 years. RESULTS: Estimates of person-years saved in the first 5 years included 28,534 from improved treatment of localized bladder cancer and 26,241 from improved treatment of advanced lung cancer, representing, respectively, 31.4{\%} and 2.8{\%} of the person-years which could have been saved for these diseases (the {"}relative impact of new treatment on survival{"}). The new therapies from all eight positive phase III trials would have saved 114,641 person-years over the first 5 years. The estimate from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial was 99,441 person-years over the first 5 years. CONCLUSION: New cancer therapies have a proven and quantifiable impact on population mortality. Successful cancer prevention has a similarly large impact. However, federal funding for cancer prevention is less than half that of cancer treatment. As a result of its enormous potential for extending life, cancer prevention warrants increased funding and support from federal funding agencies.",
author = "Unger, {Joseph M.} and Michael LeBlanc and Crowley, {John J.} and Grossman, {H. Barton} and Natale, {Ronald B.} and Wozniak, {Antoinette J.} and Berenson, {James R.} and List, {Alan F.} and Peters, {William A.} and Flanigan, {Robert C.} and Macdonald, {John S.} and Muhyi Al-Sarraf and Thompson, {Ian M.} and Coltman, {Charles A.}",
year = "2003",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Oncology",
issn = "0732-183X",
publisher = "American Society of Clinical Oncology",
number = "23 Suppl",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Estimating the impact of new clinical trial proven cancer therapy and cancer chemoprevention on population mortality

T2 - the Karnofsky Memorial lecture.

AU - Unger, Joseph M.

AU - LeBlanc, Michael

AU - Crowley, John J.

AU - Grossman, H. Barton

AU - Natale, Ronald B.

AU - Wozniak, Antoinette J.

AU - Berenson, James R.

AU - List, Alan F.

AU - Peters, William A.

AU - Flanigan, Robert C.

AU - Macdonald, John S.

AU - Al-Sarraf, Muhyi

AU - Thompson, Ian M.

AU - Coltman, Charles A.

PY - 2003/12/1

Y1 - 2003/12/1

N2 - PURPOSE: The 31-year "war on cancer" has focused largely on therapeutic (as opposed to preventative) cancer research, which, in both the public and private sector, has received the majority of funding. Meanwhile the prevention of cancer has received less attention. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed eight positive phase III therapeutic trials of the Southwest Oncology Group, and estimated how the observed improvements in survival from the new therapies would impact mortality at the population level (utilizing Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-data). We compared these results with the impact of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. The measure of impact was person-years saved in the first 5 years. RESULTS: Estimates of person-years saved in the first 5 years included 28,534 from improved treatment of localized bladder cancer and 26,241 from improved treatment of advanced lung cancer, representing, respectively, 31.4% and 2.8% of the person-years which could have been saved for these diseases (the "relative impact of new treatment on survival"). The new therapies from all eight positive phase III trials would have saved 114,641 person-years over the first 5 years. The estimate from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial was 99,441 person-years over the first 5 years. CONCLUSION: New cancer therapies have a proven and quantifiable impact on population mortality. Successful cancer prevention has a similarly large impact. However, federal funding for cancer prevention is less than half that of cancer treatment. As a result of its enormous potential for extending life, cancer prevention warrants increased funding and support from federal funding agencies.

AB - PURPOSE: The 31-year "war on cancer" has focused largely on therapeutic (as opposed to preventative) cancer research, which, in both the public and private sector, has received the majority of funding. Meanwhile the prevention of cancer has received less attention. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed eight positive phase III therapeutic trials of the Southwest Oncology Group, and estimated how the observed improvements in survival from the new therapies would impact mortality at the population level (utilizing Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-data). We compared these results with the impact of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. The measure of impact was person-years saved in the first 5 years. RESULTS: Estimates of person-years saved in the first 5 years included 28,534 from improved treatment of localized bladder cancer and 26,241 from improved treatment of advanced lung cancer, representing, respectively, 31.4% and 2.8% of the person-years which could have been saved for these diseases (the "relative impact of new treatment on survival"). The new therapies from all eight positive phase III trials would have saved 114,641 person-years over the first 5 years. The estimate from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial was 99,441 person-years over the first 5 years. CONCLUSION: New cancer therapies have a proven and quantifiable impact on population mortality. Successful cancer prevention has a similarly large impact. However, federal funding for cancer prevention is less than half that of cancer treatment. As a result of its enormous potential for extending life, cancer prevention warrants increased funding and support from federal funding agencies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=17044455641&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=17044455641&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 14645404

AN - SCOPUS:17044455641

VL - 21

JO - Journal of Clinical Oncology

JF - Journal of Clinical Oncology

SN - 0732-183X

IS - 23 Suppl

ER -