Epigenetic and inflammatory markers in older adults with cancer: A Young International Society of Geriatric Oncology narrative review

Nikesha Gilmore, Kah Poh Loh, Gabor Liposits, Sukeshi Patel Arora, Paula Vertino, Michelle Janelsins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The number of adults aged ≥ 65 years with cancer is rapidly increasing. Older adults with cancer are susceptible to treatment-related acute and chronic adverse events, resulting in loss of independence, reduction in physical function, and decreased quality of life. Nevertheless, evidence-based interventions to prevent or treat acute and chronic adverse events in older adults with cancer are limited. Several promising blood-based biomarkers related to inflammation and epigenetic modifications are available to identify older adults with cancer who are at increased risk of accelerated aging and physical, functional, and cognitive impairments caused by the cancer and its treatment. Inflammatory changes and epigenetic modifications can be reversible and targeted by lifestyle changes and interventions. Here we discuss ways in which changes in inflammatory and epigenetic pathways influence the aging process and how these pathways can be targeted by interventions aimed at reducing inflammation and aging-associated biological markers. As the number of older adults with cancer entering survivorship continues to increase, it is becoming progressively more important to understand ways in which the benefit from treatment can be enhanced while reducing the effects of accelerated aging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101655
JournalJournal of Geriatric Oncology
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2024

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • DNA methylation
  • Epigenetics
  • Inflammation
  • Older adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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