Enlarged occlusal surfaces on first molars due to severe attrition and hypercementosis: Examples from prehistoric coastal populations of Texas

Anthony G. Comuzzie, D. Gentry Steele

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    23 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    During an examination of prehistoric samples from the Texas coast, individuals consistently exhibited a suite of traits on the first molars that included severe wear, hypercementosis, and resorption of the buccal margin of the alveolus. The occlusal surface of the tooth was worn below the cervical margin, with the subsequent incorporation of the buccal surface of the buccal roots into the occlusal plane. This expanded occlusal surface, which extends the buccal surface beyond the normal edge of the tooth, is composed of a combination of original enamel, secondary dentin, and cementum. There is a marked rounding of the buccal aspect of the occlusal surface. These conditions were noted in both maxillary and mandibular first molars. The resorption of alveolar bone surrounding the buccal roots resembles resorption associated with periodontal infection and is thought to be the result of severe levels of stress being applied to this portion of the dentition.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)9-15
    Number of pages7
    JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Anthropology
    Volume78
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1989

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Anatomy
    • Anthropology

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