Engineering bone regeneration with bioabsorbable scaffolds with novel microarchitecture

Kyumin Whang, D. R. Elenz, E. K. Nam, D. C. Tsai, C. H. Thomas, G. W. Nuber, F. H. Glorieux, R. Travers, S. M. Sprague, Kevin E. Healy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

288 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Critical-sized defects (CSDs) were introduced into rat calvaria to test the hypothesis that absorption of surrounding blood, marrow, and fluid from the osseous wound into a bioabsorbable polymer matrix with unique microarchitecture can induce bone formation via hematoma stabilization. Scaffolds with 90% porosity, specific surface areas of approximately 10 m2/g, and median pore sizes of 16 and 32 μm, respectively, were fabricated using an emulsion freeze-drying process. Contact radiography and radiomorphometry revealed the size of the initial defects (50 mm2) were reduced to 27 ± 11 mm2 and 34 ± 17 mm2 for CSDs treated with poly(D,L- lactide-co-glycolide). Histology and histomorphometry revealed scaffolds filled with significantly more de novo bone than negative controls (p < 0.007), more osteoid than both the negative and autograft controls (p < 0.002), and small masses of mineralized tissue (<15 μm in diameter) observed within the scaffolds. Based on these findings, we propose a change in the current paradigm regarding the microarchitecture of scaffolds for in vivo bone regeneration to include mechanisms based on hematoma stabilization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-51
Number of pages17
JournalTissue Engineering
Volume5
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bone Regeneration
Scaffolds
Hematoma
Bone
Defects
Freeze Drying
Porosity
Autografts
Stabilization
Emulsions
Osteogenesis
Skull
Radiography
Histology
Polymers
Bone Marrow
Scaffolds (biology)
Polymer matrix
Bone and Bones
Specific surface area

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Whang, K., Elenz, D. R., Nam, E. K., Tsai, D. C., Thomas, C. H., Nuber, G. W., ... Healy, K. E. (1999). Engineering bone regeneration with bioabsorbable scaffolds with novel microarchitecture. Tissue Engineering, 5(1), 35-51.

Engineering bone regeneration with bioabsorbable scaffolds with novel microarchitecture. / Whang, Kyumin; Elenz, D. R.; Nam, E. K.; Tsai, D. C.; Thomas, C. H.; Nuber, G. W.; Glorieux, F. H.; Travers, R.; Sprague, S. M.; Healy, Kevin E.

In: Tissue Engineering, Vol. 5, No. 1, 1999, p. 35-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Whang, K, Elenz, DR, Nam, EK, Tsai, DC, Thomas, CH, Nuber, GW, Glorieux, FH, Travers, R, Sprague, SM & Healy, KE 1999, 'Engineering bone regeneration with bioabsorbable scaffolds with novel microarchitecture', Tissue Engineering, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 35-51.
Whang K, Elenz DR, Nam EK, Tsai DC, Thomas CH, Nuber GW et al. Engineering bone regeneration with bioabsorbable scaffolds with novel microarchitecture. Tissue Engineering. 1999;5(1):35-51.
Whang, Kyumin ; Elenz, D. R. ; Nam, E. K. ; Tsai, D. C. ; Thomas, C. H. ; Nuber, G. W. ; Glorieux, F. H. ; Travers, R. ; Sprague, S. M. ; Healy, Kevin E. / Engineering bone regeneration with bioabsorbable scaffolds with novel microarchitecture. In: Tissue Engineering. 1999 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 35-51.
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