Endoscopic technique for sagittal synostosis

David F. Jimenez, Constance M. Barone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study aimed to present a 16-year experience of treating sagittal synostosis with endoscopic-assisted techniques and postoperative cranial orthotic therapy. In 1996, we introduced the use of endoscopes for the management of sagittal synostosis in four young infants. During the subsequent years, we have treated a total of 256 patients with great success and long-term follow-up. Presented herein are the techniques and results of such clinical experience. Methods: A total of 256 patients with sagittal synostosis have been treated between May 1996 and April 2012. There were 187 males and 69 females. Mean age at time of surgery was 3.9 months. A wide-vertex craniectomy with bilateral barrel stave osteotomies of the temporal and parietal bones using small scalp incisions and endoscopic viewing techniques was performed. Instruments have been developed to assist with the operation. All patients were placed in postoperative molding cranial orthosis. Results: Mean estimated blood loss was 27 cc. Mean transfusion rate was 7 %. Mean surgical time was 57 min. Mean length of stay was 1.1 days. Using cephalic index (CI) as an anthropometric measurement to judge head shape, our results were classified as excellent (CI>80), good (CI 80-70), or poor (CI<70). A total of 87 % were classified as excellent, 9 % as good, and 4 % as poor. Conclusions: Endoscopic-assisted management of sagittal synostosis is a safe, efficacious, and excellent option for treating this condition with long-lasting, superb results. It is associated with minimal morbidity and complications and improved results over traditional procedures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1333-1339
Number of pages7
JournalChild's Nervous System
Volume28
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Fingerprint

Craniosynostoses
Head
Parietal Bone
Orthotic Devices
Temporal Bone
Endoscopes
Operative Time
Osteotomy
Scalp
Length of Stay
Morbidity

Keywords

  • Cranial suture
  • Craniosynostosis
  • Endoscopy
  • Helmets
  • Sagittal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Endoscopic technique for sagittal synostosis. / Jimenez, David F.; Barone, Constance M.

In: Child's Nervous System, Vol. 28, No. 9, 09.2012, p. 1333-1339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jimenez, David F. ; Barone, Constance M. / Endoscopic technique for sagittal synostosis. In: Child's Nervous System. 2012 ; Vol. 28, No. 9. pp. 1333-1339.
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