Emergency angiography for trauma patients and potential association with acute kidney injury

Ryo Yamamoto, Ramon F. Cestero, Jo Yoshizawa, Katsuya Maeshima, Junichi Sasaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Angiography has been conducted as a hemostatic procedure for trauma patients. While several complications, such as tissue necrosis after embolization, have been reported, little is known regarding subsequent acute kidney injury (AKI) due to contrast media. To elucidate whether emergency angiography would introduce kidney dysfunction in trauma victims, we compared the incidence of AKI between patients who underwent emergency angiography and those who did not. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using a nationwide trauma database (2004–2019), and adult trauma patients were included. The indication of emergency angiography was determined by both trauma surgeons and radiologists, and AKI was diagnosed by treating physicians based on a rise in serum creatinine and/or fall in urine output according to any published standard criteria. Incidence of AKI was compared between patients who underwent emergency angiography and those who did not. Propensity score matching was conducted to adjust baseline characteristics including age, comorbidities, mechanism of injury, vital signs on admission, Injury Severity Scale (ISS), degree of traumatic kidney injury, surgical procedures, and surgery on the kidney, such as nephrectomy and nephrorrhaphy. Results: Among 230,776 patients eligible for the study, 14,180 underwent emergency angiography. The abdomen/pelvis was major site for angiography (10,624 [83.5%]). Embolization was performed in 5,541 (43.5%). Propensity score matching selected 12,724 pairs of severely injured patients (median age, 59; median ISS, 25). While the incidence of AKI was rare, it was higher among patients who underwent emergency angiography than in those who did not (140 [1.1%] vs. 67 [0.5%]; odds ratio = 2.10 [1.57–2.82]; p < 0.01). The association between emergency angiography and subsequent AKI was observed regardless of vasopressor usage or injury severity in subgroup analyses. Conclusions: Emergency angiography in trauma patients was probably associated with increased incidence of AKI. The results should be validated in future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number56
JournalWorld Journal of Emergency Surgery
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Acute kidney injury
  • Angiography
  • Embolization
  • Hemostasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Emergency Medicine

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