Electronic integration of glottic closure and cricopharyngealrelaxation for the control of aspiration: A canine study

ILSA SCHWARTZ, MICHAEL BRONIATOWSKI, RAYMOND DESSOFFY, KOUROS AZAR, CHARLES R. DAVIES, MARTIN S. TROTT, Frank R Miller, HARVEY M. TUCKER

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aspiration can result from muscular weakness or paralysis of laryngopharyngeal muscles after lower motor neuron disorders (e.g., stroke) or unchecked gastroesophageal reflux. We submit that rehabilitation of the finely tuned swallowing mechanism should provide at least restoration of the normal dynamic relationships between glottic closure and cricopharyngeal relaxation. In three dogs under general endotracheal anesthesia, the recurrent laryngeal nerves and the pharyngeal musculature were exposed through a midline cervical incision. A tracheotomy was performed to allow unhindered laryngoscopic exposure of the vocal cords. A no. 9 endotracheal tube passed through the upper esophageal sphincter was used as a pressure transducer by saline inflation of its cuff and linked to an oscilloscope. The cricopharyngeus was placed under baseline tension with pulse trains administered by an intramuscular needle electrode with a circuit previously used for agonist/antagonist coupling of reinnervated facial musculature. A second output channel was linked to the contralateral recurrent laryngeal nerve by a bipolar electrode. As the pulse width of the current to the recurrent laryngeal nerve increased, that to the cricopharyngeus was reciprocally decreased, producing snug glottic closure and synchronous cricopharyngeal relaxation. Results were documented on videotape. These findings were highly reproducible. We believe that the novel approach proposed in the current model offers an attractive solution to long-term aspiration problems resulting from an imbalance between vocal cord and cricopharyngeal activities. (OTOLARYNGOL HEAD NECK SURG 1995;112:424-9.).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)424-429
Number of pages6
JournalOtolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume112
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Electronic Nose
Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve
Pharyngeal Muscles
Canidae
Vocal Cords
Tongue
Endotracheal Anesthesia
Electrodes
Upper Esophageal Sphincter
Pressure Transducers
Tracheotomy
Videotape Recording
Muscle Weakness
Economic Inflation
Motor Neurons
Deglutition
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Paralysis
General Anesthesia
Needles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Surgery

Cite this

SCHWARTZ, ILSA., BRONIATOWSKI, MICHAEL., DESSOFFY, RAYMOND., AZAR, KOUROS., DAVIES, CHARLES. R., TROTT, MARTIN. S., ... TUCKER, HARVEY. M. (1995). Electronic integration of glottic closure and cricopharyngealrelaxation for the control of aspiration: A canine study. Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, 112(3), 424-429. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0194-5998(95)70278-4

Electronic integration of glottic closure and cricopharyngealrelaxation for the control of aspiration : A canine study. / SCHWARTZ, ILSA; BRONIATOWSKI, MICHAEL; DESSOFFY, RAYMOND; AZAR, KOUROS; DAVIES, CHARLES R.; TROTT, MARTIN S.; Miller, Frank R; TUCKER, HARVEY M.

In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 112, No. 3, 1995, p. 424-429.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

SCHWARTZ, ILSA, BRONIATOWSKI, MICHAEL, DESSOFFY, RAYMOND, AZAR, KOUROS, DAVIES, CHARLESR, TROTT, MARTINS, Miller, FR & TUCKER, HARVEYM 1995, 'Electronic integration of glottic closure and cricopharyngealrelaxation for the control of aspiration: A canine study', Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 112, no. 3, pp. 424-429. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0194-5998(95)70278-4
SCHWARTZ, ILSA ; BRONIATOWSKI, MICHAEL ; DESSOFFY, RAYMOND ; AZAR, KOUROS ; DAVIES, CHARLES R. ; TROTT, MARTIN S. ; Miller, Frank R ; TUCKER, HARVEY M. / Electronic integration of glottic closure and cricopharyngealrelaxation for the control of aspiration : A canine study. In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. 1995 ; Vol. 112, No. 3. pp. 424-429.
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