Elective delivery of infants with macrosomia in diabetic women: Reduced shoulder dystocia versus increased cesarean deliveries

D. L. Conway, O. Langer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

129 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We sought to test the hypothesis that elective delivery of infants diagnosed with macrosomia by ultrasonographic studies in diabetic women will significantly reduce the rate of shoulder dystocia without significantly increasing cesarean section rate. STUDY DESIGN: In a prospective study diabetic women with ultrasonographic estimated fetal weight ≤4250 gm underwent elective cesarean section; women with estimated fetal weight ≤90th percentile but <4250 gm underwent induction of labor. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were analyzed and compared for the periods before and after initiation of the protocol. RESULTS: A total of 2604 diabetic patients were included in this study. The rate of shoulder dystocia was significantly lower after instituting the protocol (2.4% vs 1.1%, odds ratio 2.2). The cesarean section rate increased significantly between the two periods (21.7% vs 25.1%, p < 0.04). Ultrasonography correctly identified the presence or absence of macrosomia in 87% of patients. Only 10.6% of diabetic patients at term required intervention under the protocol (6.8% labor induction, 3.8% elective cesarean section). The rate of shoulder dystocia was 7.4% in macrosomic infants delivered vaginally. CONCLUSIONS: An ultrasonographically estimated weight threshold as an indication for elective delivery in diabetic women reduces the rate of shoulder dystocia without a clinically meaningful increase in cesarean section rate. This practice, in conjunction with an intensified management approach to diabetes, improves the outcome of these high-risk women and their infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)922-925
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume178
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

Keywords

  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Macrosomia
  • Shoulder dystocia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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