Effects of rat strain and method of inducing ethanol drinking on Pavlovian-Instrumental-Transfer with ethanol-paired conditioned stimuli

R. J. Lamb, Brett C. Ginsburg, Alexander Greig, Charles W. Schindler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ethanol-paired conditioned stimuli (CSs) are widely thought to invigorate ethanol responding, and thus, precipitate relapse to drinking. However, preclinical studies investigating this issue using Pavlovian-Instrumental-Transfer (PIT) procedures have had mixed results, with some studies finding PIT while others did not. The studies failing to show PIT used Lewis rats and induced ethanol drinking using a post-prandial drinking procedure. The present experiments examined whether either of these two variables influenced the magnitude of PIT observed. In the first experiment, ethanol drinking in Lewis rats was induced using either sucrose fading or post-prandial drinking. In the second experiment, ethanol drinking was induced using post-prandial drinking in either Long-Evans Hooded or Lewis rats. In both experiments, rats were trained to respond for ethanol under a random interval schedule. Subsequently with the lever removed, 2-min light presentations were paired with ethanol deliveries. Finally, with the lever returned, the effect of light presentations on responding was tested while responding was in extinction. Light presentations similarly affected responding in Lewis rats regardless of the method of drinking induction. Likewise, light presentations similarly affected responding in both Lewis and Long-Evans Hooded rats. Neither ethanol induction method nor rat strain affected the magnitude of PIT observed, and thus, neither likely explains previous failures to observe PIT with ethanol-maintained behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-57
Number of pages11
JournalAlcohol
Volume79
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2019

Keywords

  • Alcoholism
  • Craving
  • Ethanol self-administration
  • Operant behavior
  • Relapse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Biochemistry
  • Toxicology
  • Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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