Effects of lorcaserin on cocaine and methamphetamine self-administration and reinstatement of responding previously maintained by cocaine in rhesus monkeys

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Abstract

Stimulant abuse is a serious public health issue for which there is no effective pharmacotherapy. The serotonin2C [5-hydroxytryptamine2C (5-HT2C)] receptor agonist lorcaserin decreases some abuse-related effects of cocaine in monkeys and might be useful for treating stimulant abuse. The current study investigated the effectiveness of lorcaserin to reduce self-administration of either cocaine or methamphetamine and cocaine-induced reinstatement of extinguished responding. Four rhesus monkeys responded under a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule in which the response requirement increased after each cocaine infusion (32-320 mg/kg/infusion). A separate group of four monkeys responded under a fixed-ratio (FR) schedule for cocaine (32 mg/kg/infusion) and reinstatement of extinguished responding was examined following administration of noncontingent infusions of cocaine (0.1-1 mg/kg) that were combined with response-contingent presentations of the drug-associated stimuli. Finally, three monkeys responded under a FR schedule for methamphetamine (0.32-100 mg/kg/infusion). Lorcaserin (3.2 mg/kg) significantly decreased the final ratio completed (i.e., decreased break point) in monkeys responding under the PR schedule and reduced the reinstatement of responding for drug-associated stimuli following a noncontingent infusion of cocaine; these effects did not appear to change when lorcaserin was administered daily. The same dose of lorcaserin decreased responding for methamphetamine in two of the three monkeys, and the effect was maintained during daily lorcaserin administration; larger doses given acutely (10-17.8 mg/kg) significantly decreased responding for methamphetamine, although that effect was not sustained during daily lorcaserin administration. Together, these results indicate that lorcaserin might be effective in reducing cocaine and methamphetamine abuse and cocaine relapse at least in some individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-391
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Volume359
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology

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