Effects of Long-Term, Medically Supervised, Drug-Free Treatment and Methadone Maintenance Treatment on Drug Users' Emergency Department Use and Hospitalization

Barbara J. Turner, Christine Laine, Chuya P. Yang, Walter W. Hauck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined the effect of drug treatment in 1996 on repeated (≥2) emergency department visits and hospitalization in 1997 in a cohort of New York State Medicaid-enrolled human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative drug users. In HIV-positive drug users, the adjusted odds of repeated emergency department visits were increased for those receiving no long-term treatment (odds ratio [OR], 1.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-2.75), whereas the adjusted odds for those receiving methadone treatment and those receiving drug-free treatment for ≥6 months did not differ. The adjusted odds of hospitalization in the HIV-positive group were higher for those receiving long-term methadone treatment (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.14-2.55) and for those receiving no long-term treatment (OR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.29-2.88), compared with those receiving drug-free treatment. In the HIV-negative group, these associations were similar but weaker. For both HIV-positive and HIV-negative drug users, long-term drug-free treatment was at least as effective as long-term methadone treatment in reducing use of services indicative of poorer access to care and/or poorer health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S457-S463
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume37
Issue number12 SUPPL. 5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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