Effects of intravenous, sternal, and humerus intraosseous administration of Hextend on time of administration and hemodynamics in a hypovolemic swine model

Dawn Blouin, Brian T. Gegel, Don Johnson, Jose C. Garcia-Blanco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine if there were significant differences among humerus intraosseous (HIO), sternal intraosseous (SIO), and intravenous (IV) administration of 500 mL Hextend in hemodynamics or administration time in a hypovolemic swine model.Vivarium.

SUBJECTS: Yorkshire swine; sample size was based on a large effect size of 0.5, an α of 0.05, and a power of 80 percent Swine were randomly assigned to one of four groups: HIO (n = 9), SIO (n = 9), IV (n = 9), and control (n = 9).

INTERVENTION: Swine were exsanguinated 30 percent of their blood volume. Hextend (500 mL) was administered by either the HIO, SIO, or IV route; the control group received none.

MAIN OUTCOME: Time of administration of Hextend; systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), and stroke volume (SV) data were collected every 2 minutes and compared by group over 8 minutes.

RESULTS: A repeated analysis of variance found that there were no significant differences in SBP, DBP, MAP, HR, CO, and SV among HIO, SIO, and IV groups over 8 minutes (p > 0.05). An analyses of variance determined that there was no significant difference between groups relative to time of administration (p = 0.521).

CONCLUSION: When IV access is difficult, both HIO and SIO are effective techniques for rapid vascular access and the administration of Hextend for patients in hypovolemic shock.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-192
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican journal of disaster medicine
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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