Effects of high-fat diet and losartan on renal cortical blood flow using contrast ultrasound imaging

Anne Emilie Declèves, Joshua J. Rychak, Dan J. Smith, Kumar Sharma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity- related kidney disease occurs as a result of complex interactions between metabolic and hemodynamic effects. Changes in microvascular perfusion may play a major role in kidney disease; however, these changes are difficult to assess in vivo. Here, we used perfusion ultrasound imaging to evaluate cortical blood flow in a mouse model of high-fat diet-induced kidney disease. C57BL/6J mice were randomized to a standard diet (STD) or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 30 wk and then treated either with losartan or a placebo for an additional 6 wk. Noninvasive ultrasound perfusion imaging of the kidney was performed during infusion of a microbubble contrast agent. Blood flow within the microvasculature of the renal cortex and medulla was derived from imaging data. An increase in the time required to achieve full cortical perfusion was observed for HFD mice relative to STD. This was reversed following treatment with losartan. These data were concurrent with an increased glomerular filtration rate in HFD mice compared with STD- or HFD-losartan-treated mice. Losartan treatment also abrogated fibro-inflammatory disease, assessed by markers at the protein and messenger level. Finally, a reduction in capillary density was found in HFD mice, and this was reversed upon losartan treatment. This suggests that alterations in vascular density may be responsible for the elevated perfusion time observed by imaging. These data demonstrate that ultrasound contrast imaging is a robust and sensitive method for evaluating changes in renal microvascular perfusion and that cortical perfusion time may be a useful parameter for evaluating obesity-related renal disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology
Volume305
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Losartan
Renal Circulation
High Fat Diet
Ultrasonography
Perfusion
Kidney Diseases
Kidney
Perfusion Imaging
Diet
Obesity
Microbubbles
Microvessels
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Contrast Media
Blood Vessels
Therapeutics
Hemodynamics
Placebos
Proteins

Keywords

  • Obesity-related kidney disease
  • Renal perfusion
  • Ultrasound contrast imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Urology

Cite this

Effects of high-fat diet and losartan on renal cortical blood flow using contrast ultrasound imaging. / Declèves, Anne Emilie; Rychak, Joshua J.; Smith, Dan J.; Sharma, Kumar.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology, Vol. 305, No. 9, 01.11.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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