Effects of dietary polyunsaturated and saturated fats on lipoproteins in the baboon

John Babiak, Alex V. Nichols, Elaine L. Gong, C. Alex McMahan, Thomas J. Kuehl, Glen E. Mott, Henry C. McGill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of 2 different dietary fats (40% of calories from corn oil or coconut oil), in the presence of high-dietary cholesterol (1.7 mg/kcal), on the lipoprotein profiles of baboons (Papio cynocephalus sp) were studied by analytic ultracentrifugation, gradient gel electrophoresis (GGE), and heparin-manganese chloride precipitation. Relative to the corn oil (polyunsaturated fat) diet, the coconut oil (saturated fat) diet significantly increased total serum cholesterol by 43% (P < 0.001) by increasing non-precipitable cholesterol (HDL-C) 58% (P < 0.001) and precipitable cholesterol (VLDL + LDL-C) 35% of (P < 0.001). Analytic ultracentrifugal observations indicated that the increase in HDL-C was due to considerable increases in both HDL-I (baboon HDL of size 100-125 Å and hydrated density 1.063-1.120 g/ml) and F1.20 0 9-28 lipoproteins (material of size 125-220 Å and hydrated density 1.03-1.08 g/ml, and containing HDL apolipoproteins and apo E). Concentrations of other HDL subpopulations were unaffected by the dietary saturated rat. The increase in VLDL + LDL-C was due to increased LDL (SF 0 5-12), and to some extent, F of the F1.20 0 9-28 lipoproteins were precipitable by heparin-manganese. In contrast, saturated fat (relative to polyunsaturated fat) induced lower concentrations of IDL saturated fat (relative to polyunsaturated fat) induced lower concentrations of IDL (SF 0 12-20) and VLDL (SF 0 20-100). Lipoprotein size distributions by GGE indicated 5 HDL subpopulations and 2 or more LDL subpopulations in the sera of most baboons. The type of dietary fat did not affect the particle size range of each of the the HDL or LDL subpopulations. The results indicate that dietary fat markedly modulates the distribution of cholesterol between apo A-I-containing (HDL and F1.20 0 9-28) and apo B-containing (IDL and VLDL) lipoproteins without altering the presence of subpopulations based on particle size.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1985

Fingerprint

Papio
Lipoproteins
Fats
Dietary Fats
Corn Oil
Apolipoproteins E
Particle Size
Heparin
Electrophoresis
Papio cynocephalus
Gels
Cholesterol
HDL2 Lipoprotein
IDL Lipoproteins
Diet
Dietary Cholesterol
VLDL Cholesterol
VLDL Lipoproteins
Ultracentrifugation
Apolipoprotein A-I

Keywords

  • Analytic ultracentrifugation
  • Baboons
  • Cholesterol feeding
  • F 9-28 lipoproteins
  • Heparin
  • manganese chloride precipitation
  • Polyunsaturated fats
  • Saturated fats

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Babiak, J., Nichols, A. V., Gong, E. L., McMahan, C. A., Kuehl, T. J., Mott, G. E., & McGill, H. C. (1985). Effects of dietary polyunsaturated and saturated fats on lipoproteins in the baboon. Atherosclerosis, 57(1), 1-17. https://doi.org/10.1016/0021-9150(85)90133-9

Effects of dietary polyunsaturated and saturated fats on lipoproteins in the baboon. / Babiak, John; Nichols, Alex V.; Gong, Elaine L.; McMahan, C. Alex; Kuehl, Thomas J.; Mott, Glen E.; McGill, Henry C.

In: Atherosclerosis, Vol. 57, No. 1, 1985, p. 1-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Babiak, J, Nichols, AV, Gong, EL, McMahan, CA, Kuehl, TJ, Mott, GE & McGill, HC 1985, 'Effects of dietary polyunsaturated and saturated fats on lipoproteins in the baboon', Atherosclerosis, vol. 57, no. 1, pp. 1-17. https://doi.org/10.1016/0021-9150(85)90133-9
Babiak, John ; Nichols, Alex V. ; Gong, Elaine L. ; McMahan, C. Alex ; Kuehl, Thomas J. ; Mott, Glen E. ; McGill, Henry C. / Effects of dietary polyunsaturated and saturated fats on lipoproteins in the baboon. In: Atherosclerosis. 1985 ; Vol. 57, No. 1. pp. 1-17.
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abstract = "The effects of 2 different dietary fats (40{\%} of calories from corn oil or coconut oil), in the presence of high-dietary cholesterol (1.7 mg/kcal), on the lipoprotein profiles of baboons (Papio cynocephalus sp) were studied by analytic ultracentrifugation, gradient gel electrophoresis (GGE), and heparin-manganese chloride precipitation. Relative to the corn oil (polyunsaturated fat) diet, the coconut oil (saturated fat) diet significantly increased total serum cholesterol by 43{\%} (P < 0.001) by increasing non-precipitable cholesterol (HDL-C) 58{\%} (P < 0.001) and precipitable cholesterol (VLDL + LDL-C) 35{\%} of (P < 0.001). Analytic ultracentrifugal observations indicated that the increase in HDL-C was due to considerable increases in both HDL-I (baboon HDL of size 100-125 {\AA} and hydrated density 1.063-1.120 g/ml) and F1.20 0 9-28 lipoproteins (material of size 125-220 {\AA} and hydrated density 1.03-1.08 g/ml, and containing HDL apolipoproteins and apo E). Concentrations of other HDL subpopulations were unaffected by the dietary saturated rat. The increase in VLDL + LDL-C was due to increased LDL (SF 0 5-12), and to some extent, F of the F1.20 0 9-28 lipoproteins were precipitable by heparin-manganese. In contrast, saturated fat (relative to polyunsaturated fat) induced lower concentrations of IDL saturated fat (relative to polyunsaturated fat) induced lower concentrations of IDL (SF 0 12-20) and VLDL (SF 0 20-100). Lipoprotein size distributions by GGE indicated 5 HDL subpopulations and 2 or more LDL subpopulations in the sera of most baboons. The type of dietary fat did not affect the particle size range of each of the the HDL or LDL subpopulations. The results indicate that dietary fat markedly modulates the distribution of cholesterol between apo A-I-containing (HDL and F1.20 0 9-28) and apo B-containing (IDL and VLDL) lipoproteins without altering the presence of subpopulations based on particle size.",
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AU - Babiak, John

AU - Nichols, Alex V.

AU - Gong, Elaine L.

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AU - Kuehl, Thomas J.

AU - Mott, Glen E.

AU - McGill, Henry C.

PY - 1985

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N2 - The effects of 2 different dietary fats (40% of calories from corn oil or coconut oil), in the presence of high-dietary cholesterol (1.7 mg/kcal), on the lipoprotein profiles of baboons (Papio cynocephalus sp) were studied by analytic ultracentrifugation, gradient gel electrophoresis (GGE), and heparin-manganese chloride precipitation. Relative to the corn oil (polyunsaturated fat) diet, the coconut oil (saturated fat) diet significantly increased total serum cholesterol by 43% (P < 0.001) by increasing non-precipitable cholesterol (HDL-C) 58% (P < 0.001) and precipitable cholesterol (VLDL + LDL-C) 35% of (P < 0.001). Analytic ultracentrifugal observations indicated that the increase in HDL-C was due to considerable increases in both HDL-I (baboon HDL of size 100-125 Å and hydrated density 1.063-1.120 g/ml) and F1.20 0 9-28 lipoproteins (material of size 125-220 Å and hydrated density 1.03-1.08 g/ml, and containing HDL apolipoproteins and apo E). Concentrations of other HDL subpopulations were unaffected by the dietary saturated rat. The increase in VLDL + LDL-C was due to increased LDL (SF 0 5-12), and to some extent, F of the F1.20 0 9-28 lipoproteins were precipitable by heparin-manganese. In contrast, saturated fat (relative to polyunsaturated fat) induced lower concentrations of IDL saturated fat (relative to polyunsaturated fat) induced lower concentrations of IDL (SF 0 12-20) and VLDL (SF 0 20-100). Lipoprotein size distributions by GGE indicated 5 HDL subpopulations and 2 or more LDL subpopulations in the sera of most baboons. The type of dietary fat did not affect the particle size range of each of the the HDL or LDL subpopulations. The results indicate that dietary fat markedly modulates the distribution of cholesterol between apo A-I-containing (HDL and F1.20 0 9-28) and apo B-containing (IDL and VLDL) lipoproteins without altering the presence of subpopulations based on particle size.

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KW - Baboons

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KW - Heparin

KW - manganese chloride precipitation

KW - Polyunsaturated fats

KW - Saturated fats

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