Effect of running shoe type on the distribution and magnitude of plantar pressures in individuals with low- or high-arched feet

Joseph M. Molloy, Douglas S. Christie, Deydre S. Teyhen, Nancy S. Yeykal, Bradley S. Tragord, Matthew S. Neal, Eric S. Nelson, Thomas McPoil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Research addressing the effect of running shoe type on the low- or higharched foot during gait is limited. We sought 1) to analyze mean plantar pressure and mean contact area differences between low- and high-arched feet across three test conditions, 2)to determine which regions of the foot (rearfoot, midfoot, and forefoot) contributed to potential differences in mean plantar pressure and mean contact area, and 3) to determine theassociation between the static arch height index and the dynamic modified arch index. Methods: Plantar pressure distributions for 75 participants (40 low arched and 35 high arched) were analyzed across three conditions (nonshod, motion control running shoes, and cushioning running shoes) during treadmill walking. Results: In the motion control and cushioning shoe conditions, mean plantar contact area increased in the midfoot (28% for low arched and 68% for high arched), whereas mean plantar pressure decreased by approximately 30% relative to the nonshod condition. There was moderate to good negative correlation between the arch height index and the modified arch index. Conclusions: Cushioning and motion control running shoes tend to increase midfoot mean plantar contact area while decreasing mean plantar pressure across the low- or high-arched foot.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)330-338
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Podiatric Medical Association
Volume99
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Podiatry
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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