Effect of maternal cocaine administration on maternal and fetal glucose, lactate, and insulin in sheep

James R. Owiny, Drew Sadowsky, Margaret T. Jones, Thomas J. Reimers, Peter W. Nathanielsz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although cocaine use during pregnancy is an important cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality, there are no reports of its effect on maternal and fetal carbohydrate metabolism. Six pregnant ewes and their fetuses were instrumented under halothane general anesthesia at 113–119 days’ gestation. Between 124–135 days’ gestation, the ewes received a single infusion of vehicle or cocaine (1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg) into the jugular vein. At least 24 hours was allowed between successive injections. Maternal and fetal blood samples were drawn at 30 and 20 minutes before and at 5,15, 30, and 60 minutes after the injection. Both maternal and fetal glucose and lactate concentrations increased (P <.05) after injection of cocaine at 2.0 mg/kg. There were no significant changes in maternal or fetal plasma insulin concentrations after vehicle or cocaine administration. Induction of hyperglycemia and lactacidemia could be mechanisms whereby cocaine exerts its adverse effects during pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)901-904
Number of pages4
JournalObstetrics and gynecology
Volume77
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1991
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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