Effect of length of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist on in vitro fertilization pregnancy rates

IV Donald Royster, Matthew G. Retzloff, Randal D. Robinson, Jeremy A. King, Anthony M. Propst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare pregnancy outcomes between shorter and longer in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles using GnRH antagonist protocol. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort analysis at a large military academic hospital. A total of 351 patients underwent 412 IVF/ICSI cycles using a GnRH antagonist protocol from September 2002 through May 2008. Clinical pregnancy and live birth rates for all IVF/ICSI cycles were compared independently for both total length of ovarian stimulation with gonadotropins (< 10 days vs. ≥ 10 days) and GnRH antagonist use (< 4 days vs. ≥ 4 days), respectively. RESULTS: Clinical pregnancy rates were 54.6% among cycles with total gonadotropin use < 10 days vs. 48.6% for those cycles ≥ 10 days, odds ratio 0.82 (0.53-1.27); live birth rates were 50.0% vs. 47.7%, odds ratio 0.91 (0.59-1.42). Clinical pregnancy rates were 54.0% among cycles with GnRH antagonist use < 4 days vs. 52.8% with GnRH antagonist use ≥ 4 days, odds ratio 0.95 (0.62-1.45); live birth rates were 46.8% vs. 50.4%, odds ratio 1.15 (0.76-1.76). CONCLUSION: Clinical pregnancy and live birth rates are not adversely affected by longer IVF/ICSI cycles using GnRH antagonists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)415-420
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Reproductive Medicine
Volume57
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antagon
  • Ganirelix acetate
  • GnRH
  • GnRH antagonist
  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone
  • In vitro fertilization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Effect of length of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist on in vitro fertilization pregnancy rates'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this