Effect of divalproex on brain morphometry, chemistry, and function in youth at high-risk for bipolar disorder: A pilot study

Kiki Chang, Asya Karchemskiy, Ryan Kelley, Meghan Howe, Amy S Garrett, Nancy Adleman, Allan Reiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Divalproex has been found efficacious in treating adolescents with and at high risk for bipolar disorder (BD), but little is known about the effects of mood stabilizers on the brain itself. We sought to examine the effects of divalproex on the structure, chemistry, and function of specific brain regions in children at high-risk for BD. Methods: A total of 24 children with mood dysregulation but not full BD, all offspring of a parent with BD, were treated with divalproex monotherapy for 12 weeks. A subset of 11 subjects and 6 healthy controls were scanned with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, magnetic resonance spectroscopy [MRS], and functional MRI [fMRI]) at baseline and after 12 weeks. Results: There were no significant changes in amygdalar or cortical volume found over 12 weeks. Furthermore, no changes in neurometabolite ratios were found. However, we found the degree of decrease in prefrontal brain activation to correlate with degree of decrease in depressive symptom severity. Conclusions: Bipolar offspring at high risk for BD did not show gross morphometric, neurometabolite, or functional changes after 12 weeks of treatment with divalproex. Potential reasons include small sample size, short exposure to medications, or lack of significant neurobiological impact of divalproex in this particular population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-59
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Brain Chemistry
Valproic Acid
Bipolar Disorder
Brain
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Sample Size
Healthy Volunteers
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Depression
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Effect of divalproex on brain morphometry, chemistry, and function in youth at high-risk for bipolar disorder : A pilot study. / Chang, Kiki; Karchemskiy, Asya; Kelley, Ryan; Howe, Meghan; Garrett, Amy S; Adleman, Nancy; Reiss, Allan.

In: Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 51-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chang, Kiki ; Karchemskiy, Asya ; Kelley, Ryan ; Howe, Meghan ; Garrett, Amy S ; Adleman, Nancy ; Reiss, Allan. / Effect of divalproex on brain morphometry, chemistry, and function in youth at high-risk for bipolar disorder : A pilot study. In: Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology. 2009 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. 51-59.
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