Dynamic Labeling Discernment: Contextual Importance of Self-identifiers for Individuals in Recovery

Austin M. Brown, J. M. McDaniel, V. H. Johnson, R. D. Ashford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent studies associate identifiers, such as “alcoholic/addict”, with stigma, discrimination, and service deficits. Yet, little is known about why and how self-identifiers are chosen. This study analyzed qualitative responses from individuals (N = 42) in recovery from substance use disorders (SUDs) concerning their use of “alcoholic/addict” or “person with a SUD”. Evaluative structure and generative theories were developed via latent content analysis and grounded theory. Secondary analysis evidenced four thematic constructs: contextual significance, flexibility/rigidity, leveraging identity to counteract stigma, and indications of identity integration/disintegration. Some individuals indicated the contextual utility of certain identifiers, regardless of associated stigma and bias.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-230
Number of pages16
JournalAlcoholism Treatment Quarterly
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Substance use disorder
  • bias
  • recovery
  • self-identification
  • stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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