Does inter-subject variability in cortical functional organization increase with neural 'distance' from the periphery?

P. T. Fox, J. V. Pardo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

In mapping the functional anatomy of the human brain, anatomical variability is a recurring concern. The degree to which the functional organization of any one subject or group of subjects is more generally predictive is largely unknown. We have previously reported that the inter-subject variability of primary visual, somatosensory and motor cortices is small (4-8 mm). Many have suggested, however, that higher-order brain areas will be considerably more variable. For this reason we assessed the anatomical variability of several brain areas participating in language perception and production. In 10 anatomically normal subjects undergoing evaluation for partial complex epilepsy we applied a previously described battery of lexical tasks; intra-subject image averaging was used to minimize the effects of variations in response magnitude. We found inter-subject anatomical variability to be uniformly consistent, with no appreciable effect of distance from the neural periphery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-140; discussion 140-144
JournalCiba Foundation symposium
Volume163
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Does inter-subject variability in cortical functional organization increase with neural 'distance' from the periphery?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this