Do occupational therapy and physical therapy curricula teach critical thinking skills?

Kimberly A. Vogel, Michael Geelhoed, Kimatha O. Grice, Douglas Murphy

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    14 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study evaluated whether critical thinking ability can be improved through participation in occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT) curricula. The researchers compared levels of the critical thinking skills of OT and PT students at the beginning and end of their programs to determine whether changes occurred and to examine facets of the curricula that may have caused the differences. The curricula include teaching strategies of problem-based learning modules, small group discussion and problem-solving, case studies, clinical observation, and evidence-based practice assignments, as well as teaching about critical thinking as a process in itself. Fifty OT and PT students completed the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal at the beginning and end of 20 mos of the academic phase of their master's degree programs. Researchers analyzed the data using a one-way repeated-measures ANOVA. Results showed no differences between OT and PT students on the pretest or post-test and no differences for PT students between the pretest and post-test. OT students' scores increased significantly from pretest to post-test. The influence of the timing of teaching critical thinking skills in the resulting differences between the two curricula, as well as the validity of the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal is a valid measure of critical thinking changes in allied health students are discussed.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)152-157
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Allied Health
    Volume38
    Issue number3
    StatePublished - Sep 2009

    Fingerprint

    Occupational Therapy
    Curriculum
    Students
    Teaching
    Therapeutics
    Research Personnel
    Thinking
    Problem-Based Learning
    Aptitude
    Evidence-Based Practice
    Analysis of Variance
    Observation
    Health

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

    Cite this

    Vogel, K. A., Geelhoed, M., Grice, K. O., & Murphy, D. (2009). Do occupational therapy and physical therapy curricula teach critical thinking skills? Journal of Allied Health, 38(3), 152-157.

    Do occupational therapy and physical therapy curricula teach critical thinking skills? / Vogel, Kimberly A.; Geelhoed, Michael; Grice, Kimatha O.; Murphy, Douglas.

    In: Journal of Allied Health, Vol. 38, No. 3, 09.2009, p. 152-157.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Vogel, KA, Geelhoed, M, Grice, KO & Murphy, D 2009, 'Do occupational therapy and physical therapy curricula teach critical thinking skills?', Journal of Allied Health, vol. 38, no. 3, pp. 152-157.
    Vogel, Kimberly A. ; Geelhoed, Michael ; Grice, Kimatha O. ; Murphy, Douglas. / Do occupational therapy and physical therapy curricula teach critical thinking skills?. In: Journal of Allied Health. 2009 ; Vol. 38, No. 3. pp. 152-157.
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