Do Corticosteroid Injections for the Treatment of Pain Influence the Efficacy of mRNA COVID-19 Vaccines?

Spine Intervention Society’s Patient Safety Committee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

MYTH: Corticosteroid injection for the treatment of pain and inflammation is known to decrease the efficacy of the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) vaccines for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). FACT: There is currently no direct evidence to suggest that a corticosteroid injection before or after the administration of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine decreases the efficacy of the vaccine.However, based on the known timeline of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression following epidural and intraarticular corticosteroid injections, and the timeline of the reported peak efficacy of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, physicians should consider timing an elective corticosteroid injection such that it is administered no less than 2 weeks prior to a COVID-19 mRNA vaccine dose and no less than 1 week following a COVID-19 mRNA vaccine dose, whenever possible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)994-1000
Number of pages7
JournalPain medicine (Malden, Mass.)
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 20 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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