Dissemination of an evidence-based behavioral intervention to alleviate distress in caregivers of children recently diagnosed with cancer: Bright IDEAS

Megan Voll, Diane L. Fairclough, Elaine H. Morrato, Demetria M. McNeal, Leanne Embry, Wendy Pelletier, Robert B. Noll, Olle Jane Z. Sahler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Four multisite randomized clinical trials of > 1400 caregivers of children newly diagnosed with cancer showed that the Bright IDEAS (BI) paradigm of problem-solving skills training is an acceptable and efficacious approach to alleviating the high levels of distress they experience. To facilitate providing evidence-based caregiver support as recommended in the pediatric oncology standards of care, the project described here was designed to disseminate BI to 200 psychosocial professionals. Procedure: We partnered with the Children's Oncology Group (COG), Association of Pediatric Oncology Social Workers (APOSW), Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses (APHON), and special interest group in pediatric hematology/oncology of the Society for Pediatric Psychology (SPP). Membership surveys revealed substantial enthusiasm for training in BI. We structured training to include review of the evidence base for BI, role plays, and strategies for implementation at individual sites. Four conference calls designed to enhance implementation were held one, two, three, and five months after training. Results: Ten 1.5-day workshops were held in conjunction with annual meetings of COG, APOSW, APHON, and SPP. A total of 209 psychosocial clinicians from 134 sites were trained. Evaluations were highly favorable. Trainees had provided BI to 545 individuals as of the last conference call. Conclusions: Initial dissemination goals were met. BI is now available at numerous pediatric oncology centers, but it has not become part of routine care. Future work focused on implementation might consider top-down approaches that include direct communication with pediatric oncologists and hospital leaders about the benefits of incorporating this evidence-based intervention systemically.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • caregivers
  • childhood cancer
  • distress
  • evidence-based
  • intervention
  • problem-solving skills
  • psychosocial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Hematology
  • Oncology

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