Disease drivers of aging

Richard J. Hodes, Felipe Sierra, Steven N. Austad, Elissa Epel, Gretchen N. Neigh, Kristine M. Erlandson, Marissa J. Schafer, Nathan K. LeBrasseur, Christopher Wiley, Judith Campisi, Mary E. Sehl, Rosario Scalia, Satoru Eguchi, Balakuntalam S Kasinath, Jeffrey B. Halter, Harvey Jay Cohen, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Tim A. Ahles, Nir Barzilai, Arti Hurria & 1 others Peter W. Hunt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has long been known that aging, at both the cellular and organismal levels, contributes to the development and progression of the pathology of many chronic diseases. However, much less research has examined the inverse relationship—the contribution of chronic diseases and their treatments to the progression of aging-related phenotypes. Here, we discuss the impact of three chronic diseases (cancer, HIV/AIDS, and diabetes) and their treatments on aging, putative mechanisms by which these effects are mediated, and the open questions and future research directions required to understand the relationships between these diseases and aging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)45-68
Number of pages24
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1386
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Fingerprint

Chronic Disease
Aging of materials
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Pathology
Medical problems
HIV
Phenotype
Research
Neoplasms
Progression
Direction compound

Keywords

  • age-related
  • aging
  • cancer
  • chronic
  • diabetes
  • disease
  • HIV
  • pathology
  • prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Hodes, R. J., Sierra, F., Austad, S. N., Epel, E., Neigh, G. N., Erlandson, K. M., ... Hunt, P. W. (2016). Disease drivers of aging. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1386(1), 45-68. https://doi.org/10.1111/nyas.13299

Disease drivers of aging. / Hodes, Richard J.; Sierra, Felipe; Austad, Steven N.; Epel, Elissa; Neigh, Gretchen N.; Erlandson, Kristine M.; Schafer, Marissa J.; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.; Wiley, Christopher; Campisi, Judith; Sehl, Mary E.; Scalia, Rosario; Eguchi, Satoru; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S; Halter, Jeffrey B.; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Ahles, Tim A.; Barzilai, Nir; Hurria, Arti; Hunt, Peter W.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 1386, No. 1, 01.12.2016, p. 45-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hodes, RJ, Sierra, F, Austad, SN, Epel, E, Neigh, GN, Erlandson, KM, Schafer, MJ, LeBrasseur, NK, Wiley, C, Campisi, J, Sehl, ME, Scalia, R, Eguchi, S, Kasinath, BS, Halter, JB, Cohen, HJ, Demark-Wahnefried, W, Ahles, TA, Barzilai, N, Hurria, A & Hunt, PW 2016, 'Disease drivers of aging', Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1386, no. 1, pp. 45-68. https://doi.org/10.1111/nyas.13299
Hodes RJ, Sierra F, Austad SN, Epel E, Neigh GN, Erlandson KM et al. Disease drivers of aging. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2016 Dec 1;1386(1):45-68. https://doi.org/10.1111/nyas.13299
Hodes, Richard J. ; Sierra, Felipe ; Austad, Steven N. ; Epel, Elissa ; Neigh, Gretchen N. ; Erlandson, Kristine M. ; Schafer, Marissa J. ; LeBrasseur, Nathan K. ; Wiley, Christopher ; Campisi, Judith ; Sehl, Mary E. ; Scalia, Rosario ; Eguchi, Satoru ; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S ; Halter, Jeffrey B. ; Cohen, Harvey Jay ; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy ; Ahles, Tim A. ; Barzilai, Nir ; Hurria, Arti ; Hunt, Peter W. / Disease drivers of aging. In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2016 ; Vol. 1386, No. 1. pp. 45-68.
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