Discriminative stimulus effects of 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylphenyl)-2- aminopropane in rhesus monkeys

Jun Xu Li, Kenner C. Rice, Charles P France

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Discriminative stimulus effects of 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylphenyl)-2- aminopropane (DOM) and related drugs have been studied extensively in rodents, although the generality of those findings across species is not known. The goals of this study were to see whether monkeys could discriminate DOM and to characterize the DOM discriminative stimulus by studying a variety of drugs, including those with hallucinogenic activity in humans. Four rhesus monkeys discriminated between 0.32 mg/kg s.c. DOM and vehicle after an average of 116 (range = 85-166) sessions while responding under a fixed ratio 5 schedule of stimulus shock termination. Increasing doses of DOM occasioned increased responding on the drug lever with the training dose occasioning DOM-lever responding for up to 2 h. The serotonin (5-HT)2A/2C receptor antagonists ritanserin and ketanserin, the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist (+)2,3-dimethoxyphenyl-1-[2-(4-piperidine)-methanol] (MDL100907), and its (-)stereoisomer MDL100009 [(-)2,3-dimethoxyphenyl-1-[2-(4-piperidine)-methanol], but not haloperidol, completely blocked the discriminative stimulus effects of DOM. Quipazine as well as several drugs with hallucinogenic activity in humans, including (+)lysergic acid diethylamide, (-)DOM, and 2,5-dimethoxy-4-(n)- propylthiophenethylamine (2C-T-7), occasioned DOM-lever responding. The κ-opioid receptor agonists U-50488 and salvinorin A (a hallucinogen) did not exert DOM-like effects and neither did ketamine, phencyclidine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, cocaine, morphine, yohimbine, fenfluramine, 8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT), or (±)-2-(N-phenethyl-N-1′ -propyl)amino-5-hydroxy-tetralin hydrochloride (N-0434). These data confirm in nonhuman primates a prominent role for 5-HT2A receptors in the discriminative stimulus effects of some drugs with hallucinogenic activity in humans. The failure of another drug with hallucinogenic activity (salvinorin A) to substitute for DOM indicates that different classes of hallucinogens exert qualitatively different discriminative stimulus effects in nonhumans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)827-833
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Volume324
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

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2,5-Dimethoxy-4-Methylamphetamine
Macaca mulatta
Hallucinogens
salvinorin A
Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2A
Human Activities
Methanol
Quipazine
(trans)-Isomer 3,4-Dichloro-N-methyl-N-(2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-cyclohexyl)-benzeneacetamide
Ritanserin
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2C
Serotonin 5-HT2 Receptor Antagonists
Fenfluramine
8-Hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin
Phencyclidine
Ketanserin
Lysergic Acid Diethylamide
Stereoisomerism
Yohimbine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Discriminative stimulus effects of 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylphenyl)-2- aminopropane in rhesus monkeys. / Li, Jun Xu; Rice, Kenner C.; France, Charles P.

In: Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Vol. 324, No. 2, 02.2008, p. 827-833.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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