Diet-induced early-stage atherosclerosis in baboons: Lipoproteins, atherogenesis, and arterial compliance

Michael C. Mahaney, Genesio M. Karere, David L. Rainwater, Venkata S. Voruganti, Edward J. Dick, Michael A. Owston, Karen S. Rice, Laura A. Cox, Anthony G. Comuzzie, John L. Vandeberg

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine whether dietary manipulation can reliably induce early-stage atherosclerosis and clinically relevant changes in vascular function in an established, well-characterized non-human primate model. Methods: We fed 112 baboons a high-cholesterol, high-fat challenge diet for two years. We assayed circulating biomarkers of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, at 0, 7, and 104 weeks into the challenge; assessed arterial compliance noninvasively at 104 weeks; and measured atherosclerotic lesions in three major arteries at necropsy. Results: We observed evidence of atherosclerosis in all but one baboon fed the two-year challenge diet. CVD risk biomarkers, the prevalence, size, and complexity of arterial lesions, plus consequent arterial stiffness, were increased in comparison with dietary control animals. Conclusions: Feeding baboons a high-cholesterol, high-fat diet for two years reliably induces atherosclerosis, with risk factor profiles, arterial lesions, and changes in vascular function also seen in humans.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalJournal of Medical Primatology
    DOIs
    StateAccepted/In press - 2017

    Fingerprint

    atherogenesis
    Papio
    atherosclerosis
    lesions (animal)
    lipoproteins
    compliance
    Lipoproteins
    Compliance
    Atherosclerosis
    High Fat Diet
    high fat diet
    Diet
    blood vessels
    cardiovascular diseases
    Blood Vessels
    biomarkers
    Cardiovascular Diseases
    Biomarkers
    Cholesterol
    cholesterol

    Keywords

    • Cardiovascular disease
    • High-fat diet
    • Non-human primate

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Animal Science and Zoology
    • veterinary(all)

    Cite this

    Mahaney, M. C., Karere, G. M., Rainwater, D. L., Voruganti, V. S., Dick, E. J., Owston, M. A., ... Vandeberg, J. L. (Accepted/In press). Diet-induced early-stage atherosclerosis in baboons: Lipoproteins, atherogenesis, and arterial compliance. Journal of Medical Primatology. https://doi.org/10.1111/jmp.12283

    Diet-induced early-stage atherosclerosis in baboons : Lipoproteins, atherogenesis, and arterial compliance. / Mahaney, Michael C.; Karere, Genesio M.; Rainwater, David L.; Voruganti, Venkata S.; Dick, Edward J.; Owston, Michael A.; Rice, Karen S.; Cox, Laura A.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Vandeberg, John L.

    In: Journal of Medical Primatology, 2017.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Mahaney, MC, Karere, GM, Rainwater, DL, Voruganti, VS, Dick, EJ, Owston, MA, Rice, KS, Cox, LA, Comuzzie, AG & Vandeberg, JL 2017, 'Diet-induced early-stage atherosclerosis in baboons: Lipoproteins, atherogenesis, and arterial compliance', Journal of Medical Primatology. https://doi.org/10.1111/jmp.12283
    Mahaney, Michael C. ; Karere, Genesio M. ; Rainwater, David L. ; Voruganti, Venkata S. ; Dick, Edward J. ; Owston, Michael A. ; Rice, Karen S. ; Cox, Laura A. ; Comuzzie, Anthony G. ; Vandeberg, John L. / Diet-induced early-stage atherosclerosis in baboons : Lipoproteins, atherogenesis, and arterial compliance. In: Journal of Medical Primatology. 2017.
    @article{35786cf955094d40917f9ae7c9ad8d35,
    title = "Diet-induced early-stage atherosclerosis in baboons: Lipoproteins, atherogenesis, and arterial compliance",
    abstract = "Background: The purpose of this study was to determine whether dietary manipulation can reliably induce early-stage atherosclerosis and clinically relevant changes in vascular function in an established, well-characterized non-human primate model. Methods: We fed 112 baboons a high-cholesterol, high-fat challenge diet for two years. We assayed circulating biomarkers of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, at 0, 7, and 104 weeks into the challenge; assessed arterial compliance noninvasively at 104 weeks; and measured atherosclerotic lesions in three major arteries at necropsy. Results: We observed evidence of atherosclerosis in all but one baboon fed the two-year challenge diet. CVD risk biomarkers, the prevalence, size, and complexity of arterial lesions, plus consequent arterial stiffness, were increased in comparison with dietary control animals. Conclusions: Feeding baboons a high-cholesterol, high-fat diet for two years reliably induces atherosclerosis, with risk factor profiles, arterial lesions, and changes in vascular function also seen in humans.",
    keywords = "Cardiovascular disease, High-fat diet, Non-human primate",
    author = "Mahaney, {Michael C.} and Karere, {Genesio M.} and Rainwater, {David L.} and Voruganti, {Venkata S.} and Dick, {Edward J.} and Owston, {Michael A.} and Rice, {Karen S.} and Cox, {Laura A.} and Comuzzie, {Anthony G.} and Vandeberg, {John L.}",
    year = "2017",
    doi = "10.1111/jmp.12283",
    language = "English (US)",
    journal = "Journal of Medical Primatology",
    issn = "0047-2565",
    publisher = "Blackwell Munksgaard",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Diet-induced early-stage atherosclerosis in baboons

    T2 - Lipoproteins, atherogenesis, and arterial compliance

    AU - Mahaney, Michael C.

    AU - Karere, Genesio M.

    AU - Rainwater, David L.

    AU - Voruganti, Venkata S.

    AU - Dick, Edward J.

    AU - Owston, Michael A.

    AU - Rice, Karen S.

    AU - Cox, Laura A.

    AU - Comuzzie, Anthony G.

    AU - Vandeberg, John L.

    PY - 2017

    Y1 - 2017

    N2 - Background: The purpose of this study was to determine whether dietary manipulation can reliably induce early-stage atherosclerosis and clinically relevant changes in vascular function in an established, well-characterized non-human primate model. Methods: We fed 112 baboons a high-cholesterol, high-fat challenge diet for two years. We assayed circulating biomarkers of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, at 0, 7, and 104 weeks into the challenge; assessed arterial compliance noninvasively at 104 weeks; and measured atherosclerotic lesions in three major arteries at necropsy. Results: We observed evidence of atherosclerosis in all but one baboon fed the two-year challenge diet. CVD risk biomarkers, the prevalence, size, and complexity of arterial lesions, plus consequent arterial stiffness, were increased in comparison with dietary control animals. Conclusions: Feeding baboons a high-cholesterol, high-fat diet for two years reliably induces atherosclerosis, with risk factor profiles, arterial lesions, and changes in vascular function also seen in humans.

    AB - Background: The purpose of this study was to determine whether dietary manipulation can reliably induce early-stage atherosclerosis and clinically relevant changes in vascular function in an established, well-characterized non-human primate model. Methods: We fed 112 baboons a high-cholesterol, high-fat challenge diet for two years. We assayed circulating biomarkers of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, at 0, 7, and 104 weeks into the challenge; assessed arterial compliance noninvasively at 104 weeks; and measured atherosclerotic lesions in three major arteries at necropsy. Results: We observed evidence of atherosclerosis in all but one baboon fed the two-year challenge diet. CVD risk biomarkers, the prevalence, size, and complexity of arterial lesions, plus consequent arterial stiffness, were increased in comparison with dietary control animals. Conclusions: Feeding baboons a high-cholesterol, high-fat diet for two years reliably induces atherosclerosis, with risk factor profiles, arterial lesions, and changes in vascular function also seen in humans.

    KW - Cardiovascular disease

    KW - High-fat diet

    KW - Non-human primate

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020545070&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85020545070&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1111/jmp.12283

    DO - 10.1111/jmp.12283

    M3 - Article

    AN - SCOPUS:85020545070

    JO - Journal of Medical Primatology

    JF - Journal of Medical Primatology

    SN - 0047-2565

    ER -