Diabetes-related lower-extremity amputations disproportionately affect blacks and Mexican Americans

Lawrence A. Lavery, William H. Van Houtum, Hisham R. Ashry, David G. Armstrong, Jacqueline A Pugh

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Abstract

Background. We sought to identify the age-adjusted incidence of lower- extremity amputation (LEA) in Mexican Americans, blacks, and non-Hispanic whites with diabetes in south Texas. Methods. We summarized medical records for hospitalizations for LEAs for 1993 in six metropolitan statistical areas in south Texas. Results. Age-adjusted incidence per 10,000 patients with diabetes was 146.59 in blacks, 60.68 in non-Hispanic whites, and 94.08 in Mexican Americans. Of the patients, 47% of amputees had a history of amputation, and 17.7% were hospitalized more than once during 1993. Mexican Americans had more diabetes-related amputations (85.9%) than blacks (74.7%) or non-Hispanic whites (56.3%). Conclusions. This study is the first to identify the incidence of diabetes-related lower-extremity amputations in minorities using primary data. Minorities had both a higher incidence and proportion of diabetes-related, LEAs compared with non-Hispanic whites. Public health initiatives and national strategies, such as Healthy People 2000 and 2010, need to specifically focus on high-risk populations and high- risk geographic areas to decrease the frequency of amputation and reamputation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)593-599
Number of pages7
JournalSouthern Medical Journal
Volume92
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1999

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Amputation
Lower Extremity
Healthy People Programs
Incidence
Amputees
Medical Records
Hospitalization
Public Health
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Lavery, L. A., Van Houtum, W. H., Ashry, H. R., Armstrong, D. G., & Pugh, J. A. (1999). Diabetes-related lower-extremity amputations disproportionately affect blacks and Mexican Americans. Southern Medical Journal, 92(6), 593-599.

Diabetes-related lower-extremity amputations disproportionately affect blacks and Mexican Americans. / Lavery, Lawrence A.; Van Houtum, William H.; Ashry, Hisham R.; Armstrong, David G.; Pugh, Jacqueline A.

In: Southern Medical Journal, Vol. 92, No. 6, 1999, p. 593-599.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lavery, LA, Van Houtum, WH, Ashry, HR, Armstrong, DG & Pugh, JA 1999, 'Diabetes-related lower-extremity amputations disproportionately affect blacks and Mexican Americans', Southern Medical Journal, vol. 92, no. 6, pp. 593-599.
Lavery LA, Van Houtum WH, Ashry HR, Armstrong DG, Pugh JA. Diabetes-related lower-extremity amputations disproportionately affect blacks and Mexican Americans. Southern Medical Journal. 1999;92(6):593-599.
Lavery, Lawrence A. ; Van Houtum, William H. ; Ashry, Hisham R. ; Armstrong, David G. ; Pugh, Jacqueline A. / Diabetes-related lower-extremity amputations disproportionately affect blacks and Mexican Americans. In: Southern Medical Journal. 1999 ; Vol. 92, No. 6. pp. 593-599.
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