"Development of Physiological Response Patterns Concomitant With the Learning of Voluntary Heart Rate Control": Corrections to Hatch and Gatchel

John P. Hatch, Robert J. Gatchel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

journal abstract: Reports an error in the original article by John P. Hatch and Robert J. Gatchel (Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 1979, Vol. 93[2], pp. 306-313. Values in the main diagonal of the top half of Table 5, p. 311, (Early showing) should each be squared. In the text on p. 311, righthand column, the sentence beginning in line 6 should read as follows: Whereas HR communalities of .00 and .08 were found on the first training session, these increased to .98 and .95 for feedback and transfer trials, respectively, on the final training session. (The following abstract of this article originally appeared in record 1980-22825-001). 36 male undergraduates were instructed to raise or lower heart rate (HR) in a 7-session biofeedback experiment. HR, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, frontalis EMG activity, and skin conductance level were simultaneously recorded throughout biofeedback training. Principal axes factor analyses showed that physiological response patterning concomitant with the development of HR control was different early in training than later in training for both speeding and slowing conditions. These results indicate that Ss used different HR control strategies. Also indicated was a tendency for greater HR response specificity as training progressed for both speeding and slowing. HR speeding sessions (but not slowing) were also found to be associated with a significant increase in perceived state anxiety as measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalJournal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology
Volume94
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1980

Keywords

  • biofeedback training
  • blood pressure
  • college students
  • control strategies
  • frontalis EMG activity
  • skin conductance level
  • slowing &
  • speeding of heart rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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