Dental unit waterline contamination--a review.

Nuala Porteous

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Manufacturers of dental units have responded positively to the challenge from the American Dental Association (ADA) and the subsequent guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to deliver patient treatment water that is at least as pure as drinking water. Dental units are now routinely manufactured with anti-retraction devices that are designed to control oral fluids from being aspirated into the lines during treatment and many units have water systems that isolate source water from municipal water supply. The dental industry has also produced an array of devices and cleaning/disinfectant products to further facilitate the use of clean patient treatment water. Products that claim disinfectant efficacy must be registered with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). If they are not EPA-registered, they can be labeled as waterline cleaners only. Waterline treatment devices that are sold separately and require connection to dental units must be registered with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as medical devices. Patient treatment water quality can be monitored by using in-office chairside kits or through commercial laboratory services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)677-685
Number of pages9
JournalTexas dental journal
Volume127
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2010

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Water Purification
Tooth
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Equipment and Supplies
Disinfectants
American Dental Association
Water
Water Supply
Water Quality
United States Food and Drug Administration
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Drinking Water
Industry
Guidelines
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Dental unit waterline contamination--a review. / Porteous, Nuala.

In: Texas dental journal, Vol. 127, No. 7, 07.2010, p. 677-685.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Porteous, N 2010, 'Dental unit waterline contamination--a review.', Texas dental journal, vol. 127, no. 7, pp. 677-685.
Porteous, Nuala. / Dental unit waterline contamination--a review. In: Texas dental journal. 2010 ; Vol. 127, No. 7. pp. 677-685.
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