Delayed methylene blue improves lesion volume, multi-parametric quantitative magnetic resonance imaging measurements, and behavioral outcome after traumatic brain injury

Lora Talley Watts, Justin Alexander Long, Robert Cole Boggs, Hemanth Manga, Shiliang Huang, Qiang Shen, Timothy Q. Duong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a primary cause of death and disability in both civilian and military populations worldwide. There is a critical need for the development of neuroprotective agents that can circumvent damage and provide functional recovery. We previously showed that methylene blue (MB), a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-grandfathered drug with energy-enhancing and antioxidant properties, given 1 and 3 h post-TBI, had neuroprotective effects in rats. This study aimed to further investigate the neuroprotection of delayed MB treatment (24 h postinjury) post-TBI as measured by lesion volume and functional outcomes. Comparisons were made with vehicle and acute MB treatment. Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging and behavioral studies were performed at 1 and 3 h and 2, 7, and 14 days after an impact to the primary forelimb somatosensory cortex. We found that delaying MB treatment 24 h postinjury still minimized lesion volume and functional deficits, compared to vehicle-treated animals. The data further support the potential for MB as a neuroprotective treatment, especially when medical teatment is not readily available. MB has an excellent safety profile and is clinically approved for other indications. MB clinical trials on TBI can thus be readily explored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)194-202
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neurotrauma
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2016

Keywords

  • CCI
  • MRI
  • TBI
  • behavioral outcomes
  • methylene blue
  • mitochondria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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