Dedicated training in adult education among otolaryngology faculty

Kevin C. McMains, Jennifer Peel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis: Most faculty members undergo ad hoc training in education. This survey was developed to assess the prevalence and type of dedicated training in education received by academic otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OTO-HNS) faculty in the United States.

Study Design: Survey.

Methods: An 11-item survey was developed to assess the prevalence of dedicated instruction in education theory and practice, the types of instruction received, and the barriers to receiving instruction. The survey was sent to all OTO-HNS program directors for distribution among their respective faculty.

Results: A total of 216 responses were received. Seventy respondents (32.7%) serve as program director, associate program director, or assistant program director in their respective programs. Forty-six respondents (21.8%) had received dedicated training in education. Of the respondents who described the type of education training received, 48.7% participated in didactics/seminar, 35.9% in degree/certificate programs, 10.3% in multimodality training, and 5.1% online training. Among the barriers encountered to participation in instruction in education, time/productivity pressures was the most commonly cited reason (60.2%), followed by not knowing about the opportunity to receive training (36.4%), lack of departmental support (26.2%), lack of available training (22.3%), and the perception that such training would not be useful (7.8%).

Conclusion: Presently, only a minority of surveyed academic otolaryngologists in the United States have received any dedicated instruction in the theory and practice of education. Personal, departmental, and institutional barriers exist in many practice environments that hinder otolaryngology faculty from participating in education training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2693-2695
Number of pages3
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume124
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Keywords

  • Education
  • Environment of learning
  • Faculty
  • Otolaryngology
  • Teaching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Dedicated training in adult education among otolaryngology faculty'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this