Decreased surfactant dose-response after delayed administration to preterm rabbits

Steven R. Seidner, Machiko Ikegami, Takako Yamada, Evelyn D. Rider, Robert Castro, Alan H. Jobe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

Preterm rabbits from 14 litters were delivered at 27 d gestation, anesthetized, and treated with surfactant at birth, 15 min, or 30 min after the onset of mechanical ventilation. Doses of surfactant ranging from 0 to 100 mg/kg body weight were given intratracheally and the rabbits were ventilated for 45 min after birth. Pressure-volume curves and dynamic compliances demonstrated that the dose response to surfactant progressively decreased with delayed treatment. Following surfactant treatments of 50 mg/kg at birth, 15 min, and 30 min, peak lung volumes at 35 cm H2O were increased by 49, 30, and 8.4%, respectively over those of untreated controls. Lung lavages from rabbits receiving surfactant at 30 min had significantly higher protein contents and minimum surface tensions on the Wilhelmy balance than those from rabbits treated at birth (23.1 ± 1.1 versus 16.0 ± 2.7 dynes/cm), and lung sections from rabbits treated at 30 min had a significantly less uniform distribution of surfactant than those from rabbits treated at birth. While increasing phospholipid concentrations may reverse the inhibition of surfactant by serum proteins in vitro, there was a progressive inability of exogenous surfactant to overcome this inhibition in vivo following delayed administration to very immature rabbits. This inability to overcome inhibition with increasing surfactant dose was associated with a less uniform distribution of surfactant following its delayed administration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-120
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume152
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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