Decreased capacity for type-specific-antigen synthesis accounts for high prevalence of nontypeable strains of group B streptococci in Mexico

Gerardo C. Palacios, Elizabeth K. Eskew, Fortino Solorzano, Stephen J. Mattingly

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19 Scopus citations

Abstract

The low incidence of group B streptococcal (GBS) invasive neonatal disease in Mexico has been attributed to the low prevalence of serotype III strains, a major serotype in developed countries. In addition, nontypeable strains account for 12% of the isolates in Mexico and <1% of the isolates in the United States. In this study, 57 GBS isolates (28 nontypeable by the Lancefield procedure) from carrier and infected neonates and women from Mexico were also examined for the presence of type-specific antigen by an enzymatic procedure using N-acetylmuramidase digestion of the cell wall to release soluble type-specific antigen. Of the 28 nontypeable strains from Mexico, 23 were typeable by the enzyme extraction procedure, with serotype III being the predominant serotype in invasive disease. These results suggest that nontypeable isolates of GBS should be further examined by the enzymatic extraction procedure to determine the presence of type-specific antigen. Furthermore, these limited results suggest that serotype III is likely a major serotype in invasive disease also in Mexico.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2923-2926
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of clinical microbiology
Volume35
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

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