Daily online adaptive magnetic resonance image (MRI) guided stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary renal cell cancer

Tugce Kutuk, James McCulloch, Kathryn E. Mittauer, Tino Romaguera, Diane Alvarez, Alonso N. Gutierrez, Michael Chuong, Rupesh Kotecha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has demonstrated promising outcomes for patients with early-stage, medically inoperable, primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in large multi-institutional studies and prospective clinical trials. The traditional approach used in these studies consisted of a CT-based planning approach for target and organ-at-risk (OAR) volume delineation, treatment planning, and daily treatment delivery. Alternatively, MRI-based approaches using daily online adaptive radiotherapy have multiple advantages to improve treatment outcomes: (1) more accurate delineation of the target volume and OAR volumes with improved soft tissue visualization; (2) gated beam delivery with biofeedback from the patient; and (3) potential for daily plan adaptation due to changes in anatomy to improve target coverage, reduce dose to OARs, or both. The workflow, treatment planning principles, and aspects of treatment delivery specific to this technology are outlined using a case example of a patient with an early-stage RCC of the right kidney treated with MRI-guided SBRT using daily adaptive treatment to a dose of 42 Gy in 3 fractions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-294
Number of pages6
JournalMedical Dosimetry
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adaptive radiotherapy
  • MRI guided radiation therapy
  • Radiotherapy
  • Renal cell cancer
  • SBRT

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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