Cultured renal epithelial cells from birds and mice

Enhanced resistance of avian cells to oxidative stress and DNA damage

Charles E. Ogburn, Steven N. Austad, Donna J. Holmes, J. Veronika Kiklevich, Katherine Gollahon, Peter S. Rabinovitch, George M. Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current mechanistic theories of aging would predict that many species of birds, given their unusually high metabolic rates, body temperatures, and blood sugar levels, should age more rapidly than mammals of comparable size. On the contrary, many avian species display unusually long life spans. This finding suggests that cells and tissues from some avian species may enjoy unusually robust and/or unique protective mechanisms against fundamental aging processes, including a relatively high resistance to oxidative stress. We therefore compared the sensitivities of presumptively homologous epithelial somatic cells derived from bird and mouse kidneys to various forms of oxidative stress. When compared to murine cells, we found enhanced resistance of avian cells from three species (budgerigars, starlings, canaries) to 95% oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, paraquat, and γ-radiation. Differential resistance to 95% oxygen was demonstrated with both replicating and quiescent cultures. Hydrogen peroxide was shown to induce DNA single- strand breaks. There were fewer breaks in avian cells than in mouse cells when similarly challenged.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume53
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

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DNA Damage
Birds
Oxidative Stress
Epithelial Cells
Kidney
Hydrogen Peroxide
Melopsittacus
Canaries
Oxygen
Starlings
Single-Stranded DNA Breaks
Paraquat
Body Temperature
Blood Glucose
Mammals
Radiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging

Cite this

Ogburn, C. E., Austad, S. N., Holmes, D. J., Kiklevich, J. V., Gollahon, K., Rabinovitch, P. S., & Martin, G. M. (1998). Cultured renal epithelial cells from birds and mice: Enhanced resistance of avian cells to oxidative stress and DNA damage. Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 53(4).

Cultured renal epithelial cells from birds and mice : Enhanced resistance of avian cells to oxidative stress and DNA damage. / Ogburn, Charles E.; Austad, Steven N.; Holmes, Donna J.; Kiklevich, J. Veronika; Gollahon, Katherine; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Martin, George M.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Vol. 53, No. 4, 1998.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ogburn, Charles E. ; Austad, Steven N. ; Holmes, Donna J. ; Kiklevich, J. Veronika ; Gollahon, Katherine ; Rabinovitch, Peter S. ; Martin, George M. / Cultured renal epithelial cells from birds and mice : Enhanced resistance of avian cells to oxidative stress and DNA damage. In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. 1998 ; Vol. 53, No. 4.
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