Cultured primate aortic smooth muscle cells express both the PDGF‐‐A and PDGF‐B genes but do not secrete mitogenic activity or dimeric platelet‐derived growth factor protein

Anthony J. Valente, Ruby Delgado, John D. Metter, Chong Cho, Eugene A. Sprague, Colin J. Schwartz, Dana T. Graves

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMC) in the arterial intima of man and experimental animals is important in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Vascular SMC proliferation in vitro is stimulated by a number of agents, including the potent protein mitogen, platelet‐derived growth factor (PDGF). Recent studies on rat arterial SMC indicate that these cells may, under certain circumstances, synthesize PDGF protein mitogens, suggesting that the regulation of SMC proliferation in vivo may have an autocrine or paracrine component. In this study we demonstrate that cultured nonhuman primate (baboon) aortic SMC transcribe both the PDGF‐A and PDGF‐B genes but do not secrete detectable mitogenic activity characteristic of native PDGF. The absence of this activity was not due to the presence in the cell conditioned medium of factors inhibitory for PDGF‐mediated mitogenic activity. Metabolic labeling of the cells and immunoprecipitation with specific antibodies to human PDGF did not detect a dimeric (30 kDa) PDGF protein in either the intracellular or extracellular compartments, but instead identified PDGF‐related proteins of molecular weight 12 kDa and 100 kDa. These data suggest the presence in vascular SMC of a mechanism regulating the translation of PDGF mRNA that may play an important role in the control of SMC proliferation in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)479-485
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cellular Physiology
Volume136
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

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