Critical-thinking ability in respiratory care students and its correlation with age, educational background, and performance on national board examinations

Richard B. Wettstein, Robert L. Wilkins, Donna D. Gardner, Ruben D. Restrepo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Critical thinking is an important characteristic to develop in respiratory care students. METHODS: We used the short-form Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal instrument to measure critical-thinking ability in 55 senior respiratory care students in a baccalaureate respiratory care program. We calculated the Pearson correlation coefficient to assess the relationships between critical-thinking score, age, and student performance on the clinical-simulation component of the national respiratory care boards examination. We used chi-square analysis to assess the association between critical-thinking score and educational background. RESULTS: There was no significant relationship between critical-thinking score and age, or between critical thinking score and student performance on the clinical-simulation component. There was a significant (P =.04) positive association between a strong science-course background and critical thinking score, which might be useful in predicting a student's ability to perform in areas where critical thinking is of paramount importance, such as clinical competencies, and to guide candidateselection for respiratory care programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)284-289
Number of pages6
JournalRespiratory care
Volume56
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

Keywords

  • Critical thinking
  • Education
  • Watson-glaser critical thinking appraisal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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