Couple-focused human immunodeficiency virus prevention for young Latino parents: Randomized clinical trial of efficacy and sustainability

Deborah Koniak-Griffin, Janna Lesser, Sumiko Takayanagi, William G. Cumberland

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and sustainability of acouple-focused human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention intervention in reducing unprotected sex and increasing intent to use condoms and knowledge about AIDS. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Urban community settings in Southern California. Participants: Primarily Latino couples (168 couples; 336 individuals) who were aged 14 to 25 years, English or Spanish speaking, and coparenting a child at least 3 months of age. Intervention: A 12-hour theory-based, couple-focused HIV prevention program culturally tailored for young Latino parents, with emphasis on family protection, skill building, and issues related to gender and power. The 1 1/2-hour control condition provided basic HIV-AIDS information. Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcome measures included self-report of condom use during the past 3 months; secondary, intent to use condoms and knowledge about AIDS. Results: The HIV prevention intervention reduced the proportion of unprotected sex episodes (odds ratio, 0.87 per month from baseline to 6 months; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82-0.93) and increased intent to use condoms (slope increase, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.04-0.37) at the 6-month follow-up; however, these effects were not sustained at 12 months. Knowledge about AIDS was increased in both groups from baseline to 6 months (slope estimate, 0.57;95% CI, 0.47-0.67) and was maintained in the intervention group only through 12 months. Female participants in both groups had higher intent to use condoms and knowledge about AIDS than male participants (P≤.01). Conclusions: The couple-focused HIV prevention intervention reduced risky sexual behaviors and improved intent to use condoms among young Latino parents at the 6-month evaluation. A maintenance program is needed to improve the sustainability of effects over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)306-312
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume165
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Couple-focused human immunodeficiency virus prevention for young Latino parents: Randomized clinical trial of efficacy and sustainability'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this