COPD is associated with increased mortality in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

M. I. Restrepo, E. M. Mortensen, J. A. Pugh, A. Anzueto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

159 Scopus citations

Abstract

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who develop community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) may experience worse clinical outcomes. However, COPD is not included as a distinct diagnosis in validated instruments that predict mortality in patients with CAP. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of COPD as a comorbid condition on 30- and 90-day mortality in CAP patients. A retrospective observational study was conducted at two hospitals. Eligible patients had a discharge diagnosis and radiological confirmation of CAP. Among 744 patients with CAP, 215 had a comorbid diagnosis of COPD and 529 did not have COPD. The COPD group had a higher mean pneumonia severity index score (105±32 versus 87±34) and were admitted to the intensive care unit more frequently (25 versus 18%). After adjusting for severity of disease and processes of care, CAP patients with COPD showed significantly higher 30- and 90-day mortality than non-COPD patients. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia exhibited higher 30- and 90-day mortality than patients without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease should be evaluated for inclusion in community-acquired pneumonia prediction instruments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)346-351
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Respiratory Journal
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006

Keywords

  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • Community-acquired pneumonia
  • Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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