Contemporary Characterization of Injury Patterns, Initial Management, and Disparities in Treatment of Facial Fractures Using the National Trauma Data Bank

Philip J. Wasicek, Selim G. Gebran, Ledibabari M. Ngaage, Yuanyuan Liang, Marcus Ottochian, Jonathan J. Morrison, Yvonne Rasko, Fan Liang, Michael P. Grant, Arthur J. Nam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background:Contemporary description of facial fracture patterns and factors associated with early operative intervention at trauma centers is lacking. The purpose of this study was to characterize injuries and initial treatment patterns of patients suffering from facial fractures.Methods:Using the National Trauma Databank from 2007 to 2015, patients suffering from facial fractures were included. Demographics, injury characteristics, and outcomes including operative interventions were assessed.Results:Over 9 years, 626,270 patients were included: 74.5% were male, 39.0% suffered traumatic brain injury (TBI), and 23.3% severe noncraniofacial injuries (chest, abdomen, and/or extremity Abbreviated Injury Score ≥3). A total of 537,594 (85.8%) patients were admitted and 184,206 (34.3%) underwent operations for their facial injuries during the index hospitalization. The frequency and patterns of fractures varied by age, sex, race, and mechanism of injury. Operative intervention rates were highest for mandible (63.2%) and lowest for orbit fractures (1.0%). Multiple regression revealed that multiple factors were independently associated with the odds of early fracture repair including: female versus male (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 0.96 [0.94-0.98]), age >65 versus <18 years (0.62 [0.59-0.64]), non-white race (0.95 [0.94-0.97]), uninsured versus Medicaid (0.88 [0.86-0.90]), hospital bed size (>600 vs ≤200 beds, 1.67 [1.61-1.73]), TBI (0.70 [0.69-0.71]), and C-spine injury (0.93 [0.90-0.96]).Conclusions:Facial fractures are common among many demographic cohorts, and multiple patient and injury-specific factors influenced fracture patterns and management. Early operative intervention was highest for mandible fractures and lowest for orbit fractures. Multiple factors including age, sex, insurance status, hospital characteristics, and race/ethnicity were independently associated with early operative intervention, highlighting disparities in care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2052-2056
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Craniofacial Surgery
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • facial fracture
  • healthcare disparity
  • national trauma data bank
  • operation
  • trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

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