Concurrent risk-reduction surgery in patients with increased lifetime risk for breast and ovarian cancer: an analysis of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database

Maryam Elmi, Arash Azin, Ahmad Elnahas, David R. McCready, Tulin D. Cil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Patients with genetic susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer are eligible for risk-reduction surgery. Surgical morbidity of risk-reduction mastectomy (RRM) with concurrent bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) is unknown. Outcomes in these patients were compared to patients undergoing RRM without BSO using a large multi-institutional database. Methods: A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted using the American College of Surgeon’s National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) 2007–2016 datasets, comparing postoperative morbidity between patients undergoing RRM with patients undergoing RRM with concurrent BSO. Patients with genetic susceptibility to breast/ovarian cancer undergoing risk-reduction surgery were identified. The primary outcome was 30-day postoperative major morbidity. Secondary outcomes included surgical site infections, reoperations, readmissions, length of stay, and venous thromboembolic events. A multivariate analysis was performed to determine predictors of postoperative morbidity and the adjusted effect of concurrent BSO on morbidity. Results: Of the 5470 patients undergoing RRM, 149 (2.7%) underwent concurrent BSO. The overall rate of major morbidity and postoperative infections was 4.5% and 4.6%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the rate of postoperative major morbidity (4.5% vs 4.7%, p = 0.91) or any of the secondary outcomes between patients undergoing RRM without BSO vs. those undergoing RRM with concurrent BSO. Multivariable analysis showed Body Mass Index (OR 1.05; p < 0.001) and smoking (OR 1.78; p = 0.003) to be the only predictors associated with major morbidity. Neither immediate breast reconstruction (OR 1.02; p = 0.93) nor concurrent BSO (OR 0.94; p = 0.89) were associated with increased postoperative major morbidity. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that RRM with concurrent BSO was not associated with significant additional morbidity when compared to RRM without BSO. Therefore, this joint approach may be considered for select patients at risk for both breast and ovarian cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-223
Number of pages7
JournalBreast Cancer Research and Treatment
Volume171
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • BRCA
  • Breast cancer
  • Genetic susceptibility
  • Mastectomy
  • National surgical quality improvement program
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Risk-reduction surgery
  • Salpingo-oophorectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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